Revolutions

Timeline created by k.hagar
In History
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    Thomas Hobbes

    Emphasized reason instead of faith. Strong government based on reason. Religion and politics should be seprate. Separation of church and state.
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    John Locke

    Natural rights: life, liberty, property. Kings should be limited. Social contract. Freedom of religion.
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    Baron de Montesquieu

    Believed in limited king (ruler) power. Separation of power. Checks and balancing Limitis power so president isn't a tyranny.
  • English Bill of Rights

    English Bill of Rights
    English Bill of Rights
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    Voltaire

    Freedom. Logic and reason. Respect for individuals.
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    Benjamin Franklin

    Single legislative with advisory board. People in charge shouldn't be paid. Slavery is morally wrong. Simple lifestyle guided by common sense and reason.
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    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Majority rules. Individual freedom. Democracy. Enlightenment. Importance of reason.
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    Adam Smith

    Work benefits you and ecnomy. Don't depend on charity. Self interest guides efficient use of resources.
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    Cesare Beccaria

    Cruel and unusual punishment. Speedy trial. Education. Equality for all who commits crime.
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    Thomas Jefferson

    Government shouldn't be too strong. People's freedom and rights should be protected. All people should be involved in making decisions. Everyone should get an education.
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    Father Hidalgo

    Freedom for Mexico. Independence for Mexico. Questioned church policies. Fight for independence!
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    Mary Wollstonecraft

    Equality for men and women. Equality in education. Equality for all humans. People shouldn't be judged on gender. Equal oppurtunity for jobs. Wives treated as equals not property.
  • Tarring and Feathering

    Tarring and feathering is an old punishment that literally involved tar and feathers. The tar usually burned skin and adding the feathers made the tar stick and made it humiliating. In Spring of 1776 Captain William Smith came under the suspicion of smuggling and was tarred.
  • Seven Years’ War Peace Treaty between Great Britain and France

    Seven Years’ War Peace Treaty between Great Britain and France
    Seven Years’ War Peace Treaty between Great Britain and Franceh
  • Stamp Act passed by British Parliament

    Stamp Act passed by British Parliament
  • Repeal of Stamp Act

    Repeal of Stamp Act
  • Townsend Act, new revenue taxes on North American colonists

    Townsend Act, new revenue taxes on North American colonists
  • Riots in Boston met with violence by British troops

    Riots in Boston met with violence by British troops
    This was the Boston Massacre. Five colonists were killed by the British. This was because of the tension in the colonies that had built up from when troops first came to Massachusetts to enfoce the tax laws, the Townshend Acts.
  • The Gaspee Incident

    The British patrolled the coast of America to stop merchant ships and exam for illegal goods, and enforce Britain's laws, such as taxation. One of the ships that would patrol was The Gaspee. The Gaspee chased a merchant ship that they thought was smuggling goods. The next night men boarded the Gaspee, beat the lieutenant, and set the ship on fire.
  • Committees of Correspondence

    These were special committees who formally wrote letters to their mother country. For example, Samuel Adams formed a committee to protest decisions about the Crown and who pays salaries and such things. They wrote letters to England, their mother country.
  • The Tea Act

    The Tea Act was made to help the East India Company which was having trouble with eighteen million pounds of unsold tea. The tea was shipped to the colonies and were suppose to be sold at a bargain price. The other taxes were still in place and the leaders in America thought this was a way to get popular support for the taxes already made. Colonists sent the tea back. This led to the Boston Tea Party.
  • Boston Tea Party

    Boston Tea Party
    A group of men peacefully dumped tea into the harbor off of ship. s
  • First Continental Congress

    This was a meeting that twelve of the thirteen colonies sent delegates to. The goal was to right the wrongs to the colonies and hoped that they would be heard in London. Here are some of the major actions taken by Congress: Galloway Plan of Union, Suffolk Resolves, The Association, and Declaration of Rights and Grievances.
  • First Continental Congress

    First Continental Congress
  • The Quebec Act

    The Quebec Act gave more rights to the French in Canada which was now under British rule through the Treaty of Paris. This law gave them a new governor and council, the French civil code was used but English law could still prevail in criminal cases, recognition was given to the Catholic Church, and the boundaries were extended.
  • Revere's Ride

    Paul Revere worked for the Boston Committee of Correspondence and the Massachusetts Committee of Safety to carry news, messages, and copies of resolutions. Dr. Warren sent him to Lexington to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock that they were going to be arrested by British troops. He and two other riders sent to share the same message ended up being arrested by a British patrol. They were held for a while but then released. He returned to watch some of the battle on the Lexington Green.
  • Battle of Lexington and Concord

    Since Revere made it to Lexington to tell them the British were ready to fight and that Adams and Hancock were going to be arrested, news spread enough for messengers to tell the people in Concord. Everyone went to hide so the only things that the British could destroy was part of the supplies.
  • Second Continental Congress

    Again every colony sent delegates to the meeting. John Hancock led the meeting. Major contributions this time: Military Matters, Statements of Position, Financing the War, Independence, Opening of Diplomatic Channels, and Legislation.
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    American Revolution

  • Common Sense

    Thomas Paine anonymously wrote the book Common Sense and it was a best-seller in the colonies as well as in Europe. Paine became internationally famous. The book placed blame on the British monarch for the suffering of the colonies. The book caused arising of revolutionary thoughts.
  • Declaration of Independence

    This announced that the colonies were now independent states and no longer a part of Britain.
  • Declaration of Independence

     Declaration of Independence
  • American and French representatives sign two treaties in Paris: a Treaty of Amity and Commerce and a Treaty of Alliance

    American and French representatives sign two treaties in Paris: a Treaty of Amity and Commerce and a Treaty of Alliance
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    Simon Bolivar

    Importance of reason, science, and respecting humanity. Strong central government. Political power should be divided among branches. People should be educated before voting.
  • Ratification of Constitution of the United States of America

    Ratification of Constitution of the United States of America
  • Estates General convened for the first time in 174 years in France 1789 Storming of the Bastille, prison (and armory) in Paris

     Estates General convened for the first time in 174 years in France 1789 	   Storming of the Bastille, prison (and armory) in Paris
  • National Constituent Assembly and French Declaration of the Rights of Man

    National Constituent Assembly and French Declaration of the Rights of Man
  • Beheading of King Louis XVI

    Beheading of King Louis XVI
  • Slave rebellion in Saint Domingue

    Slave rebellion in Saint Domingue
  • U.S. Bill of Rights ratified by states

     U.S. Bill of Rights ratified by states
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    French Revolution

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    Haiti Revolution

  • French National Assembly gives citizenship to all free people of color in the colony of Saint Domingue.

    French National Assembly gives citizenship to all free people of color in the colony of Saint Domingue.
  • France declares war on Austria

    France declares war on Austria
  • France declares war on Great Britain

    France declares war on Great Britain
  • All slaves on Saint Domingue emancipated by the French revolutionary authorities to join the French army and fight against the British

    All slaves on Saint Domingue emancipated by the French revolutionary authorities to join the French army and fight against the British
  • Toussaint leads troops against the British

    Toussaint leads troops against the British
  • French colonial forces defeated by Toussaint

    French colonial forces defeated by Toussaint
  • French colonial forces defeated by Toussaint

    French colonial forces defeated by Toussaint
  • Toussaint negotiates peace with the British

    Toussaint negotiates peace with the British
  • Toussaint negotiates peace with the British

    Toussaint negotiates peace with the British
  • War ends between Great Britain and France

    War ends between Great Britain and France
  • Constitution for Haiti

    Constitution for Haiti
  • General Leclerc sent by Napoleon to subdue colony and re-institute slavery

     General Leclerc sent by Napoleon to subdue colony and re-institute slavery
  • New declaration of war between Great Britain and France

    New declaration of war between Great Britain and France
  • French withdraw troops; Haitians declare independence

    French withdraw troops; Haitians declare independence
  • Napoleon crowns himself emperor of France

    Napoleon crowns himself emperor of France
  • Jean-Jacques Dessalines crowns himself emperor of Haiti

    Jean-Jacques Dessalines crowns himself emperor of Haiti
  • British end the slave trade

    British end the slave trade
  • Declarations of self-government in most Latin American colonies

    Declarations of self-government in most Latin American colonies
  • French expelled from Spain

    French expelled from Spain
  • Napoleon defeated and French empire reduced in Europe to France alone

    Napoleon defeated and French empire reduced in Europe to France alone
  • French abolish slave trade

    French abolish slave trade
  • U.S. President Monroe declares doctrine against European interference with the new republics in the Americas, known as the Monroe Doctrine

    U.S. President Monroe declares doctrine against European interference with the new republics in the Americas, known as the Monroe Doctrine