Blues Timeline

Timeline created by nprince
In Music
  • Baby Seals Blues

    Baby Seals Blues
    Written by Baby F. Seals, Baby Seals Blues is the first published song to feature the word "Blues" as a style or genre of music
  • St. Louis Blues

    St. Louis Blues
    Known as the "Father of the Blues", W.C. Handy composed St. Louis Blues which began to put Blues on the map.
  • First Blues Vocals

    First Blues Vocals
    Blues became an overnight sensation with the release of "Crazy Blues", the first Blues song with vocals. The song featured Mamie Smith who was the first Blues singer and was the first African
    American vocalist.
  • Beale Street

    Beale Street
    From the 1920s to the 1940s, Beale Street in Memphis becomes a hotspot for Blues, Jazz, and Ragtime music. Artists such as B.B. King and Louis Armstrong were just a few of the artists who made Beale Street famous.
  • Rise of Blues Vocals

    Rise of Blues Vocals
    Due to the popularity of Mamie Smith's "Crazy Blues" singers Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey both released popular Blues songs with vocals.
  • Columbia Records Issues Discs

    Columbia Records began issuing discs that held music recorded by an electric microphone. The popularity of Blues music began to skyrocket.
  • Blind Lemon Jefferson and Texas Blues

    Blind Lemon Jefferson and Texas Blues
    One of the first solo vocalists/guitarists to become popular was Blind Lemon Jefferson. Jefferson was successful in Texas and became known as the "Father of the Texas Blues".
  • Creation of Electric Guitars

    Creation of Electric Guitars
    The early versions of electric guitars were popular in electric Blues and Jazz music.
  • Bluebird Records

    Bluebird Records
    Bluebird Records, founded in 1932, was one of the main record companies specializing in blues and jazz music. The record company had been big-name blues musicians. Musicians from Bluebird were major influences on R&B and Rock and Roll.
  • Library of Congress Recordings

    Library of Congress Recordings
    John and Alan Lomax travel parts of the United States recording folk and blues music for the Library of Congress. The two recorded mainly around the Mississippi Delta. Artists such as Muddy Waters were among the musicians recorded by the Lomaxes
  • Rise of Muddy Waters

    Rise of Muddy Waters
    Recorded by Alan Lomax, Muddy Waters begins becoming a well-known name in the Blues genre and ultimately becomes one of the most famous Blues artists.
  • T-Bone Walker

    T-Bone Walker
    T-Bone Walker becomes a big name in Texas Blues. Walker also was a major trailblazer in the use of the electric guitar for blues music.
  • Waters and Chicago Blues

    Waters and Chicago Blues
    Muddy Waters moves from Mississippi to Chicago. In Chicago, Waters uses an electric guitar to create the new Chicago Blues.
  • Billboard creates Rhythm and Blues

    Billboard creates the term Rhythm and Blues, replacing the "race" or "African American" genre of music.
  • Elvis Presley covers "That's All Right"

    Elvis Presley covers "That's All Right"
    Elvis Presley gains large exposure upon the release of his cover of Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup's tune, which was a version of Blind Lemon Jefferson's "That Black Snake Moan". Presley helped bring Blues to white audiences.
  • Chuck Berry and Blues Rock

    Chuck Berry and Blues Rock
    Chuck Berry releases "Maybellene" which was a sped-up Blues song that became Blues Rock. "Maybellene" is also considered one of the first Rock N Roll songs.
  • Blues Festivals

    Blues Festivals
    Across the country, festivals for Blues music begin to arise. These festivals were very important for bringing together young white and black audiences for Blues Music.
  • Period: to

    Rise of Blues Music

    From the origins of recording Blues to the popularization of Blues reaching multiple different audiences across the country.