History of English Literature

Timeline created by JDPM_08/01/2020
In History
  • Period:
    449
    to
    1065

    Anglo-Saxon (449 - 1065)

    Characterized by an oral tradition of epic poems, songs, and poetry. Old English or Anglo-Saxon literature was well established by pre-Christian Germanic settlers. One of the best known works from this time period is Beowulf, an epic poem about the Geatish warrior of the same name.
  • 731

    Birth of English Literature

    Birth of English Literature
    The Venerable Bede, in his monastery at Jarrow, completes his history of the English church and people The first English words, written in an Anglo-Saxon dialect known as Old English, appeared in the early Middle Ages. The oldest known text is the hymn of Caedmon.
  • 800

    Scandinavia legends

    Scandinavia legends
    Beowulf, the first great work of Germanic literature, mingles the legends of Scandinavia with the experience in England of Angles and Saxons
  • 950

    The Middle Ages

    The Middle Ages
    The literature of Scandinavia and, in particular, of Iceland has reflected two extraordinary features of the social and cultural history of pagan Europe and of Iceland. The way in which names such as Siegfried, Brunhild, and Atli (Attila) cropped up again and again in different European literatures has borne witness to the dissemination of legends and traditions common to the early Germanic tribes of Europe, starting from the great movements westward in the 4th, 5th, and 6th centuries
  • Period:
    950
    to
    1300

    Duns Scotus

    The material of the Eddas, taking shape in Iceland, derives from earlier sources in Norway, Britain and Burgund
    end:
    Duns Scotus, known as the Subtle Doctor in medieval times, later provides humanists with the name Dunsman or dunce.
  • Period:
    1050
    to
    1200

    Individuality

    The discovery of individuality was one of the most important developments
  • Period:
    1066
    to
    1484

    Medieval (1066 - 1484)

    Medieval or Middle English was sparked by the Norman invasion of Britain, when the Duke of Normandy defeated Britain's King Harold at the Battle of Hastings. The language was a dialect of French descent with Germanic influences, generally called Anglo-Norman. This fun brought English closer to what we know and use today. Famous works during this period include the History of the Kings of Great Britain (containing the legend of King Arthur) and the Canterbury Tales.
  • 1300

    Mr Duns Scotus

    Mr Duns Scotus
    The material of the Eddas, taking shape in Iceland, derives from earlier sources in Norway, Britain and Burgund
    end:
    Duns Scotus, known as the Subtle Doctor in medieval times, later provides humanists with the name Dunsman or dunce.
  • 1340

    William of Ockham

    William of Ockham
    William of Ockham advocates paring down arguments to their essentials, an approach later known as Ockham's Razor
  • 1367

    poem of Piers Plowman

    poem of Piers Plowman
    A narrator who calls himself Will, and whose name may be Langland, begins the epic poem of Piers Plowman One of four new yeomen of the chamber in Edward III's household is Geoffrey Chaucer
  • 1385

    Troilus and Criseyde

    Troilus and Criseyde
    Chaucer completes Troilus and Criseyde, his long poem about a legendary love affair in ancient Troy
  • 1387

    Canterbury Tales

     Canterbury Tales
    Chaucer begins an ambitious scheme for 100 Canterbury Tales, of which he completes only 24 by the time of his death
  • 1469

    Thomas Malory

    Thomas Malory
    Thomas Malory, in gaol somewhere in England, compiles Morte d'Arthur – an English account of the French tales of King Arthur
  • Period:
    1485
    to

    Renaissance (1485 - 1659)

    The English Renaissance saw the rise of the merchant class in Britain. Mathematics, science, technology, education, and exploration became more accessible to the masses. The feudal system was slowly dissolving as middle-class merchants increased their wealth. The plays became popular as they appealed to all classes. Notable playwrights include Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare, arguably the greatest playwright of all time.
  • 1510

    the northern Renaissance

    the northern Renaissance
    Erasmus and Thomas More take the northern Renaissance in the direction of Christian humanism
  • 1524

    William Tyndale

    William Tyndale
    William Tyndale studies in the university at Wittenberg and plans to translate the Bible into English
  • 1549

    The first version of the English prayer book

    The first version of the English prayer book
    The first version of the English prayer book, or Book of Common Prayer, is published with text by Thomas Cranmer
  • 1564

    Marlowe and Shakespeare

    Marlowe and Shakespeare
    Marlowe and Shakespeare are born in the same year, with Marlowe the older by two months
  • 1567

    The Book of Common Prayer and the New Testament

    The Book of Common Prayer and the New Testament
    The Book of Common Prayer and the New Testament are published in Welsh, to be followed by the complete Bible in 1588
  • 1582

    William Shakespeare married

    William Shakespeare married
    The 18-year-old William Shakespeare marries Anne Hathaway in Stratford-upon-Avon
  • Marlowe's first play

    Marlowe's first play
    Marlowe's first play, Tamburlaine the Great, introduces the swaggering blank verse of Elizabethan and Jacobean drama
  • Edmund Spenser

    Edmund Spenser
    English poet Edmund Spenser celebrates the Protestant Elizabeth I as The Faerie Queene
  • first masterpiece on stage

    first masterpiece on stage
    After tentative beginnings in the three parts of Henry VI, Shakespeare achieves his first masterpiece on stage with Richard III
  • Conversion.

    Saint Augustine begins the conversion of the Anglas-Saxons to Christianity. And so a new hybrid culture appears
  • Shakespeare's central character in Hamlet expresses

    Shakespeare's central character in Hamlet expresses
    Shakespeare's central character in Hamlet expresses both the ideals of the Renaissance and the disillusion of a less confident age
  • authorization of the bible

    authorization of the bible
    James I commissions the Authorized version of the Bible, which is completed by forty-seven scholars in seven years
  • The satirical voice of the English playwright

    The satirical voice of the English playwright
    The satirical voice of the English playwright Ben Jonson is heard to powerful effect in Volpone
  • Shakespeare's sonnets

    Shakespeare's sonnets
    Shakespeare's sonnets, written ten years previously, are published
  • The Tempest

    The Tempest
    Shakespeare's last completed play, The Tempest, is performed. The tempest is probably written in 1610–1611, and thought to be one of the last plays that Shakespeare wrote alone.
  • John Donne

    John Donne
    John Donne, England's leading Metaphysical poet, becomes dean of St Paul's. John Donne was the most important English metaphysical poet of the times of Queen Elizabeth I, King James I and their son Carlos I. Metaphysical poetry is more or less the equivalent of the conceptist poetry of the Spanish Golden Age of which it is contemporary.
  • thirty-six Shakespeare plays

    thirty-six Shakespeare plays
    John Heminge and Henry Condell publish thirty-six Shakespeare plays in the First Folio
  • George Herbert

    George Herbert
    George Herbert's only volume of poems, The Temple, is published posthumously George Herbert was an English poet, speaker, and priest.1 His literary work, written over 40 years, has gained recognition over the centuries.
  • John Milton

    John Milton
    John Milton's Lycidas is published in memory of a Cambridge friend, Edward King John Milton was an English poet and essayist, best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost.
  • The poems of Massachusetts

    The poems of Massachusetts
    The poems of Massachusetts author Anne Bradstreet are published in London under the title The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America Anne Bradstreet was the first American writer and poet to publish a book. Bradstreet was born Anne Dudley in Northampton, England. She was the daughter of Thomas Dudley and Dorothy Dudley. Her father was the right hand man of the Earl of Lincoln, and she grew up in a cultural environment.
  • Izaak Walton

    Izaak Walton
    Devoted fisherman Izaak Walton publishes the classic work on the subject, The Compleat Angler Izaak Walton is a 17th century English writer whose work is representative of English Restoration literature. His best known work is The Compleat Angler, although he also wrote a set of short biographies, known as the Walton's Lives.
  • Samuel Pepys

    Samuel Pepys
    On the first day of the new year Samuel Pepys gets up late, eats the remains of the turkey and begins his diary Samuel Pepys, a famous British naval officer, politician and diarist, is best known for the detailed private diary that he kept between 1660 and 1669, published more than a hundred years after his death.
  • Period: to

    Neoclassical (1660 - 1797)

    Restoration, Augustan and Age of Johnson
    Neoclassical writers tried to imitate the style of the Romans and Greeks, "Neo" which means "new" and "classical" which refers to classical works. This era was the starting point of the modern middle class and the tradition of afternoon tea. People would gather to discuss politics and other Enlightenment ideas. The characteristics of the writing were mainly focused on the appearances of the people rather than their true feelings or intentions.
  • Paradise Lost poem by John Milton

    Paradise Lost poem by John Milton
    Paradise Lost is a narrative poem by John Milton, published in 1667, just £10. It is considered a classic of English literature and has given rise to a very widespread literary topic in world literature. It is divided into twelve books and exceeds 10,000 verses written without rhyme.
  • The End of His Diary

    The End of His Diary
    Samuel Pepys ends his diary, after only writing it for nine years
  • The Pilgrim's Progress I

    The Pilgrim's Progress I
    Part I of The Pilgrim's Progress, written during John Bunyan's two spells in Bedford Gaol, is published and is immediately popular
  • Aphra Behn's novel Oroonoko

    Aphra Behn's novel Oroonoko
    Aphra Behn's novel Oroonoko makes an early protest against the inhumanity of the African slave trade
  • John Locke

    John Locke
    John Locke publishes his Essay concerning Human Understanding, arguing that all knowledge is based on experience
  • The Augustan Age

    The Augustan Age
    The Augustan Age begins in English literature, claiming comparison with the equivalent flowering under Augustus Caesar ​the period of English literature in the early 18th century, when writers such as Swift and Pope were active. The name comes from that of the Roman emperor (= ruler) Augustus, who ruled when Virgil, Horace and Ovid were writing, and suggests a classical period of literature.
  • The Tatler

    The Tatler
    The Tatler launches a new style of journalism in Britain's coffee houses, followed two years later by the Spectator Tatler is the name by which various British publications and magazines have been known. Each of them has been named as the successor to the original literary magazine founded in 1709 by Richard Steele.
  • Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge

    Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge
    25-year-old George Berkeley attacks Locke in his Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge
  • Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift

    Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift
    Jonathan Swift sends his hero on a series of bitterly satirical travels in Gulliver's Travels Gulliver's Travels is a prose satire by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, in which he pokes fun at the literary sub-genre of the "travel stories" of the European society of his time and even of human nature.
  • David Hume publishes his Treatise of Human Nature.

    David Hume publishes his Treatise of Human Nature.
    David Hume publishes his Treatise of Human Nature, in which he applies to the human mind the principles of experimental science A Treatise on Human Nature is a book by the Scottish philosopher David Hume, considered by many to be Hume's most important work and one of the most influential works in the history of philosophy.
  • Samuel Richardson's Clarissa

    Samuel Richardson's Clarissa
    Samuel Richardson's Clarissa begins the correspondence that grows into the longest novel in the English language
  • Henry Fielding

    Henry Fielding
    Henry Fielding introduces a character of lasting appeal in the lusty but good-hearted Tom Jones
  • Thomas Gray

    Thomas Gray
    English poet Thomas Gray publishes his Elegy written in a Country Church Yard Thomas Gray, was an English poet of pre-romanticism, classical scholar and professor of history at the University of Cambridge, one of the graveyard poets. Considered one of the most erudite men of his time. His poetry is not very abundant, but it is select.
  • Samuel Johnson, Dictionary of the English Language

    Samuel Johnson, Dictionary of the English Language
    Samuel Johnson publishes his magisterial Dictionary of the English Language English Translation-Published April 15, 1755 and written by Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, sometimes published as Johnson's Dictionary, is among the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language.
  • James Woodforde, start his diary.

    James Woodforde, start his diary.
    James Woodforde, an English country parson with a love of food and wine, begins a detailed diary of everyday life James Woodforde was an English clergyman, known as the author of The Diary of a Country Parson. This vivid account of parish life remained unpublished until the 20th century.
  • Laourence Sterne

    Laourence Sterne
    Laurence Sterne publishes the first two volumes of Tristram Shandy, beginning with the scene at the hero's conception Laurence Sterne was an Anglo-Irish novelist and an Anglican clergyman. He wrote the novels The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman and A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, and also published many sermons, wrote memoirs, and was involved in local politics. Sterne died in London after years of fighting tuberculosis.
  • Fingal

    Fingal
    Fingal, supposedly by the medieval poet Ossian, is a forgery in the spirit of the times by James MacPherson
  • London bookshop of Thomas Davies

    London bookshop of Thomas Davies
    James Boswell meets Samuel Johnson for the first time, in the London bookshop of Thomas Davies
  • Edward Gibbo and Horace walpole

    Edward Gibbo and Horace walpole
    English historian Edward Gibbon, sitting among ruins in Rome, conceives the idea of Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire English author Horace Walpole provides an early taste of Gothic thrills in his novel Castle of Otranto
  • A Society of Gentlemen in Scotland

    A Society of Gentlemen in Scotland
    A Society of Gentlemen in Scotland begins publication of the immensely successful Encyclopedia Britannica
  • Thomas Chatterton

    Thomas Chatterton
    17-year-old Thomas Chatterton, later hailed as a significant poet, commits suicide in a London garret
  • she stoops to conquer

    she stoops to conquer
    Oliver Goldsmith's play She Stoops to Conquer is produced in London's Covent Garden theatre Samuel Johnson and James Boswell undertake a journey together to the western islands of Scotland
  • Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine emigrates

    Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine emigrates
    Encouraged by Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine emigrates to America and settles in Philadelphia
  • the first volume of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

     the first volume of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
    English historian Edward Gibbon publishes the first volume of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Scottish economist Adam Smith analyzes the nature and causes of the Wealth of Nations
  • The School for Scandal

    The School for Scandal
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan's second play, The School for Scandal, is an immediate success in London's Drury Lane theatre The School for Scandal is a manners comedy written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. It was first performed in London at the Drury Lane Theater on May 8, 1777.
  • Songs of Innocence

    Songs of Innocence
    William Blake publishes Songs of Innocence, a volume of his poems with every page etched and illustrated by himself In his Principles Jeremy Bentham defines 'utility' as that which enhances pleasure and reduces pain
  • Edmund Burke Reflections

    Edmund Burke Reflections
    Anglo-Irish politician Edmund Burke publishes Reflections on the Revolution in France, a blistering attack on recent events across the Channel
  • the encounter

    the encounter
    Scottish poet Robert Burns publishes Tam o' Shanter, in which a drunken farmer has an alarming encounter with witches Thomas Paine publishes the first part of The Rights of Man, his reply to Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

     A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
    English author Mary Wollstonecraft publishes a passionately feminist work, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman Thomas Paine moves hurriedly to France, to escape a charge of treason in England for opinions expressed in his Rights of Man
  • 'Tyger! Tyger! burning bright'

    'Tyger! Tyger! burning bright'
    William Blake's volume Songs of Innocence and Experience includes his poem 'Tyger! Tyger! burning bright' "The Tyger" is a poem by the English poet William Blake, published in 1794 as part of his Songs of Experience collection. It is one of Blake's most reinterpreted and arranged works.
  • the Age of Reason

    the Age of Reason
    Thomas Paine publishes his completed Age of Reason, an attack on conventional Christianity The Age of Reason: An Inquiry into True and Fabulous Theology is a deist treatise, written by the English radical and 18th century American revolutionary Thomas Paine, which criticizes institutionalized religion and denies biblical inerrancy.
  • Samuel Taylor

    Samuel Taylor
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge says that while writing Kubla Khan he is interrupted by 'a person on business from Porlock
  • is Published "Lyrical Ballads"

    is Published "Lyrical Ballads"
    English poets Wordsworth and Coleridge jointly publish Lyrical Ballads, a milestone in the Romantic movement Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' is published in Lyrical Ballads
  • Period: to

    Romantic (1798 - 1831)

    Romanticism went from reason, logic and science to a belief in the senses. Feelings, imagination and experiences were valued above all else. Previously the interest in urban society was emphasized, during this movement, people focused on rural and natural life. The works consisted of extremely personal works that touched the mysterious and infinite world. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is a famous work from the Romantic period.
  • William Blake

    William Blake
    William Blake includes his poem 'Jerusalem' in the Preface to his book Milton
  • The Lay of the Last Minstrel

    The Lay of the Last Minstrel
    Walter Scott publishes The Lay of the Last Minstrel, the long romantic poem that first brings him fame. The Lay of the Last Minstrel is a six-song narrative poem with abundant antiquarian notes by Walter Scott. Set in the Scottish borders in the mid-16th century, it is sung by a troubadour in the late 17th century.
  • Walter Scott's poem Lady of the Lake

    Walter Scott's poem Lady of the Lake
    Walter Scott's poem Lady of the Lake brings tourists in unprecedented numbers to Scotland's Loch Katrine
  • Jane Austen and her first work in print

    Jane Austen and her first work in print
    Percy Bysshe Shelley is expelled from Oxford university for circulating a pamphlet with the title The Necessity of Atheism English author Jane Austen publishes her first work in print, Sense and Sensibility, at her own expense
  • The first two cantos are published of Byron's

    The first two cantos are published of Byron's
    The first two cantos are published of Byron's largely autobiographical poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, bringing him immediate fame
  • Pride and Prejudice

    Pride and Prejudice
    Pride and Prejudice, based on a youthful work of 1797 called First Impressions, is the second of Jane Austen's novels to be published
  • Ozymandias

    Ozymandias
    Percy Bysshe Shelley publishes probably his best-known poem, the sonnet Ozymandias
  • Jane Austen and two novels

    Jane Austen and two novels
    Two of Jane Austen's novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, are published in the year after her death
  • Mary Shelley

    Mary Shelley
    Mary Shelley publishes Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus, a Gothic tale about giving life to an artificial man
  • William Cobbett

    William Cobbett
    William Cobbett brings back to England the bones of Thomas Paine, who died in the USA in 1809 William Cobbett, also known by his pseudonym Peter Porcupine, was a British journalist, naturalist, and politician.
  • George Gordon Byron

    George Gordon Byron
    Byron begins publication in parts of his longest poem, Don Juan an epic satirical comment on contemporary life George Gordon Byron, known as Lord Byron, was a poet of the British romantic movement, considered by some to be one of the greatest poets in the English language and an antecedent of the figure of the accursed poet.
  • Walter Scott, Ivanhoe.

    Walter Scott, Ivanhoe.
    Walter Scott publishes Ivanhoe, a tale of love, tournaments and sieges at the time of the crusades Walter Scott, first baronet, prolific Scottish writer of British romanticism, specialized in historical novels, a genre that he created as we know it today, as well as a poet and publisher.
  • Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

    Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
    English author Thomas De Quincey publishes his autobiographical Confessions of an English Opium-Eater Confessions of an English Opium-Eater is an autobiographical account written by Thomas De Quincey, about his laudanum addiction and its effect on his life. The Confessions was "the first major work De Quincey published and the one which won him fame almost overnight.
  • William Cobbett

    William Cobbett
    English radical William Cobbett begins his journeys round England, published in 1830 as Rural Rides William Cobbett, also known by his pseudonym Peter Porcupine, was a British journalist, naturalist, and politician.
  • Table Talk by William Hazlitt

    Table Talk by William Hazlitt
    English author William Hazlitt publishes Table Talk, a two-volume collection that includes most of his best-known essays Table-Talk is a collection of essays by the English cultural critic and social commentator William Hazlitt. It was originally published in two volumes, the first of which appeared in April 1821. The essays deal with subjects such as art, literature, and philosophy.
  • John Keats dies

    John Keats dies
    English poet John Keats dies in Rome at the age of twenty-five
  • Charles Dickens works in London

     Charles Dickens works in London
    12-year-old Charles Dickens works in London in Warren's boot-blacking factory Charles John Huffam Dickens was a British writer and novelist, one of the best known in world literature, and the most outstanding of the Victorian era. He was a master of the narrative genre, to which he printed certain doses of humor and irony, while practicing acute social criticism.
  • Trollope

    Trollope
    English author Frances Trollope ruffles transatlantic feathers with her Domestic Manners of the Americans, based on a 3-year stay Anthony Trollope was one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era.
  • Pickwick Papers

     Pickwick Papers
    24-year-old Charles Dickens begins monthly publication of his first work of fiction, Pickwick Papers (published in book form in 1837) Pickwick Papers it was the first novel published by the British writer Charles Dickens. It is considered one of the masterpieces of English literature.
  • Oliver Twist

    Oliver Twist
    Charles Dickens' first novel, Oliver Twist, begins monthly publication (in book form, 1838) Oliver Twist is the second novel of the English author Charles Dickens. It was originally published as a monthly serialized novel in Bentley's Miscellany, edited by Dickens himself, between February 1837 and April 1839.
  • The Pied Piper of Hamelin

    The Pied Piper of Hamelin
    English poet Robert Browning publishes a vivid narrative poem about the terrible revenge of The Pied Piper of Hamelin is a German fable or legend, documented by the Brothers Grimm, which tells the story of a mysterious misfortune that occurred in the city of Hamelin, Germany, on June 26, 1284. There is also a famous poem in English on this subject written by Robert Browning.
  • Lays of Ancient Rome

    Lays of Ancient Rome
    English author Thomas Babington Macaulay publishes a collection of stirring ballads, Lays of Ancient Rome Lays of Ancient Rome es una colección de 1842 de poemas narrativos, por Thomas Babington Macaulay. Cuatro de estos relatan episodios heroicos de la historia romana temprana con fuertes temas dramáticos y trágicos, dando nombre a la colección.
  • Lays of Ancient Rome

    Lays of Ancient Rome
    English author Thomas Babington Macaulay publishes a collection of stirring ballads, Lays of Ancient Rome Lays of Ancient Rome is an 1842 collection of narrative poems, by Thomas Babington Macaulay. Four of these relate heroic episodes from early Roman history with strong dramatic and tragic themes, giving the collection its name.
  • A Christmas Carol

    A Christmas Carol
    Ebenezer Scrooge mends his ways just in time in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol es una novela corta escrita por el británico Charles Dickens y publicada originalmente por Chapman & Hall el 19 de diciembre de 1843. Su trama cuenta la historia de un hombre avaro y egoísta llamado Ebenezer Scrooge y su conversión tras ser visitado por una serie de fantasmas en Nochebuena.
  • Coningsby

    Coningsby
    In his novel Coningsby Benjamin Disraeli develops the theme of Conservatism uniting 'two nations', the rich and the poor Coningsby was the first of a trilogy of novels (together with Sybil and Tancred) which marked a departure from Disraeli's silver-fork novels of the 1830s and which are his most famous.
  • The Condition of the Working Class in England

    The Condition of the Working Class in England
    Friedrich Engels, after running a textile factory in Manchester, publishes The Condition of the Working Class in England The situation of the working class in England is one of Friedrich Engels' best known books. Originally written in German, it is a study of the living conditions of workers in Victorian England.
  • Book of Nonsense

    Book of Nonsense
    Edward Lear publishes his Book of Nonsense, consisting of limericks illustrated with his own cartoons A BOOK OF NONSENSE, was published in 1846 and helped to popularize the limerick, a humorous form of verse.
  • marrying secretly

    marrying secretly
    After marrying secretly, the English poets Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett go abroad to live in Florence
  • The three Brontë sisters

    The three Brontë sisters
    The three Brontë sisters jointly publish a volume of their poems and sell just two copies
  • Branwell, Emily and Anne Brontë

    Branwell, Emily and Anne Brontë
    Branwell, Emily and Anne Brontë die within a period of eight months
  • Charles Dickens

    Charles Dickens
    Charles Dickens begins the publication in monthly numbers of David Copperfield, his own favourite among his novels
  • In Memoriam, Alfred Tennyson

    In Memoriam, Alfred Tennyson
    Alfred Tennyson's elegy for a friend, In Memoriam, captures perfectly the Victorian mood of heightened sensibility in Memoriam is a long elegiac poem written by Alfred Tennyson in commemoration of his friend Arthur Henry Hallam, who died in 1833. The poem was published in 1850 and is considered one of Tennyson's best works.
  • Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases

    Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases
    London physician Peter Mark Roget publishes his dictionary of synonyms, the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases is a widely used English thesaurus, created in 1805 by Peter Mark Roget, British physician, natural theologian, and lexicographer. It was released to the public on April 29, 1852. The original edition was 15,000 words long, and each new edition has been larger.
  • Charge of the Light Brigade in the Crimea

    Charge of the Light Brigade in the Crimea
    Within six weeks of the Charge of the Light Brigade in the Crimea, Tennyson publishes a poem finding heroism in the disaster
  • Maud

    Maud
    Tennyson publishes a long narrative poem, Maud, a section of which ('Come into the garden, Maud') becomes famous as a song
  • The Warden

    The Warden
    English author Anthony Trollope publishes The Warden, the first in his series of six Barsetshire novels 'The warden' is the story of Reverend Harding, a man who lacks nothing to deserve the label of blessed soul.
  • Tom Brown's Schooldays

    Tom Brown's Schooldays
    In Tom Brown's Schooldays Thomas Hughes depicts the often brutal aspects of an English public school is an 1857 novel by Thomas Hughes. The story takes place in the 1830s at the Rugby School, an English public school. Hughes attended Rugby School from 1834 to 1842.
  • On the Origin of Species

     On the Origin of Species
    Charles Darwin puts forward the theory of evolution in On the Origin of Species, the result of 20 years' research is a book by Charles Darwin published on November 24, 1859, considered one of the precursor works of scientific literature and the foundation of the theory of evolutionary biology.
  • On Liberty John Stuart Mill

    On Liberty John Stuart Mill
    In On Liberty John Stuart Mill makes the classic liberal case for the priority of the freedom of the individual On freedom is perhaps one of the most important works written by John Stuart Mill. In this book the author presents his fundamental ideas about the limits of freedom of the individual and society.
  • Self-Help, Samuel Smiles

    Self-Help, Samuel Smiles
    Samuel Smiles provides an inspiring ideal of Victorian enterprise in Self-Help, a manual for ambitious young men with Illustrations of Character and Conduct fue un libro publicado en 1859 por Samuel Smiles.
  • Idylls of the King

    Idylls of the King
    Tennyson publishes the first part of Idylls of the King, a series of linked poems about Britain's mythical king Arthur The Idylls of the King is a set of twelve narrative poems written by the English poet Lord Alfred Tennyson that tells the legend of King Arthur, the exploits of his knights, his love for Geneva or its betrayal, which will mean the fall of Arthur and his kingdom.
  • A Tale of Two Cities

    A Tale of Two Cities
    Charles Dickens publishes his French Revolution novel, A Tale of Two Cities
  • The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

    The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám
    Edward FitzGerald publishes The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, romantic translations of the work of the Persian poet
  • Adam Bede

    Adam Bede
    English author George Eliot wins fame with her first full-length novel, Adam Bede Adam Bede was the first novel written by the British George Eliot. It was published in 1859 under a pseudonym so that her work would be taken seriously, despite the fact that she was a well-acclaimed and respected intellectual in her day.
  • Great Expectations

    Great Expectations
    Charles Dickens begins serial publication of his novel "Great Expectations" (in book form 1861) Great Expectations is a novel written by Charles Dickens. It was published as a series, from December 1, 1860 to August 1861, in the literary magazine All the Year Round, which had been founded by Dickens himself the year before.
  • The Mill on the Floss

    The Mill on the Floss
    George Eliot publishes The Mill on the Floss, her novel about the childhood of Maggie and Tom Tulliver El molino del Floss o Junto al Floss, de título original en inglés The Mill on the Floss, es una novela de la escritora realista inglesa George Eliot
  • East Lynne by Mrs Henry Wood

    East Lynne by Mrs Henry Wood
    Mrs Henry Wood publishes her first novel, East Lynne, which becomes the basis of the most popular of all Victorian melodramas East Lynne is an 1861 English novel by Ellen Wood, written as Mrs. Henry Wood. A Victorian bestseller, she is remembered primarily for her elaborate and implausible plot, centered on infidelity and double identities. There have been numerous theatrical and film adaptations.
  • Wonderland

    Wonderland
    Oxford mathematician Lewis Carroll tells 10-year-old Alice Liddell, on a boat trip, a story about her own adventures in Wonderland
  • The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley

    The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley
    English author Charles Kingsley publishes an improving fantasy for young children, The Water-Babies is a novel for children written by the Reverend Charles Kingsley. It was written between the years 1862-1863 as a serial for Macmillan's Magazine, and was first published in its entirety in 1863. It was written in part as a satire in support of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species.
  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    Lewis Carroll publishes Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a development of the story he had told Alice Liddell three years earlier Commonly abbreviated as Alice in Wonderland, it is a fantasy novel written by British mathematician, logician, photographer and writer Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll
  • Poems and Ballads

    Poems and Ballads
    Algernon Swinburne scandalizes Victorian Britain with his first collection, Poems and Ballads.
  • Das Kapital by Marx

    Das Kapital by Marx
    The first volume of Das Kapital is completed by Marx in London and is published in Hamburg It is as its subtitle says, a critical treatise on political economy; at the same time, it has also been read as a work of philosophy, as a treatise on economics, or as a political treatise on the relations of domination between the classes, on the one hand the proletarians and on the other the bourgeoisie.
  • Culture and Anarchy by Matthew Arnold

    Culture and Anarchy by Matthew Arnold
    English author Matthew Arnold publishes Culture and Anarchy, an influential collection of essays about contemporary society
  • Middlemarch by George Eliot

    Middlemarch by George Eliot
    George Eliot publishes Middlemarch, in which Dorothea makes a disastrous marriage to the pedantic Edward Casaubon A Study of Life in the Provinces is a novel by George Eliot, the pseudonym of Mary Anne Evans, later called Marian Evans. It is her seventh novel, begun in 1869 although it was interrupted for a time by the illness of Thornton Lewes, the son of her partner George Henry Lewes.
  • Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

    Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll
    Lewis Carroll publishes Through the Looking Glass, a second story of Alice's adventures Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There is a children's novel written by Lewis Carroll in 1871. It is the continuation of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Many things that happen in the book seem, metaphorically, reflected in a mirror.
  • Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

    Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
    English author Thomas Hardy has his first success with his novel Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Henry James

     Henry James
    After spending much time in Europe in recent years, Henry James moves there permanently and settles first in Paris Henry James was an American writer and literary critic, nationalized British at the end of his life, who is known from Anglo-Saxon realism and modernism for his novels and stories based on the point of view technique, which allows him the psychological analysis of the characters from within.
  • Roderick Hudson

    Roderick Hudson
    Henry James's early novel Roderick Hudson is serialized in the Atlantic Monthly and is published in book form in 1876 Roderick Hudson is considered almost unanimously the first Great Novel of Henry James. Surprisingly, this work, where the most superb Henry James is already shown in all his power, has remained unpublished until now in Spanish.
  • William Gladstone's pamphlet Bulgarian Horrors

    William Gladstone's pamphlet Bulgarian Horrors
    William Gladstone's pamphlet Bulgarian Horrors, protesting at massacre by the Turks, sells 200,000 copies within a month
  • Henry James

    Henry James
    Henry James moves to London, which remains his home for the next 22 years
  • Gerard Manley Hopkins

    Gerard Manley Hopkins
    English poet Gerard Manley Hopkins develops a new verse form that he calls 'sprung rhythmv Su obra literaria, de marcado carácter innovador y en la que se aprecian inspiraciones del prerrafaelismo y del Movimiento de Oxford de la época victoriana, introdujo nuevos recursos estilísticos e innovadoras estructuras métricas como el sprung rhythm, el Caudate sonnet o el Curtal sonnet.
  • The Hunting of the Snark

    The Hunting of the Snark
    Lewis Carroll publishes The Hunting of the Snark, a poem about a voyage in search of an elusive mythical creature The Snark Hunt is a nonsensical poem written by the British Lewis Carroll in 1874, at the age of 42.
  • Joseph Conrad

    Joseph Conrad
    21-year-old Joseph Conrad, a Polish subject, goes to sea with the British merchant navy Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski, better known as Joseph Conrad, was a Polish novelist who adopted English as a literary language. Conrad, whose work explores the vulnerability and moral instability of the human being, is considered one of the greatest novelists of the English literature.
  • Daisy Miller

    Daisy Miller
    Henry James's story Daisy Miller, about an American girl abroad, brings him a new readership Daisy Miller has two very important themes:
    - Americans abroad
    - The sadness and security of life that has not been lived.
  • The aesthetic movement and art for art sake are widely mocked and satirized in Britain

    The aesthetic movement and art for art sake are widely mocked and satirized in Britain
    The Aesthetic Movement and 'art for art's sake', attitudes personified above all by Whistler and Wilde, are widely mocked and satirized in Britain
  • Treasure Island

    Treasure Island
    Robert Louis Stevenson's adventure story, Treasure Island, features Long John Silver and Ben Gunn
  • New English Dictionary

    New English Dictionary
    Oxford University Press publishes the A volume of its New English Dictionary, which will take 37 years to reach Z New English Dictionary is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press, considered the most erudite and complete dictionary of the English language, as well as the main point of reference for its etymological study.
  • The Arabian Nights

    The Arabian Nights
    The Arabian Nights is a medieval compilation of traditional tales from the Middle East, using the form of the framed story. The core of these stories is formed by an ancient Persian book called Hazâr afsâna
  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

    The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
    Robert Louis Stevenson introduces a dual personality in his novel The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a nouvelle written by Robert Louis Stevenson and first published in English in 1886, about a lawyer, Gabriel John Utterson, who investigates the strange relationship between his old friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and the misanthrope Edward Hyde .
  • The Mayor of Casterbridge

    The Mayor of Casterbridge
    Thomas Hardy publishes his novel The Mayor of Casterbridge, which begins with the future mayor, Michael Henchard selling his wife and child at a fair The Mayor of Casterbridge: The Life and Death of a Man of Character is an 1886 novel by English author Thomas Hardy. One of Hardy's Wessex novels is set in a fictional rural England with Casterbridge replacing Dorchester in Dorset, where the author spent his youth.
  • Joseph Conrad

    Joseph Conrad
    Joseph Conrad becomes naturalized as a British subject and continues his career at sea in the far East Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski, better known as Joseph Conrad, was a Polish novelist who adopted English as a literary language. Conrad, whose work explores the vulnerability and moral instability of the human being, is considered one of the greatest novelists of the English literature.
  • A Study in Scarlet

    A Study in Scarlet
    Sherlock Holmes features in Conan Doyle's first novel, A Study in Scarlet A Study in Scarlet is a mystery novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle and published in Beeton's Christmas Annual in November 1887, with illustrations by David Henry Friston, the first appearance of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.
  • The Wanderings of Oisin

    The Wanderings of Oisin
    23-year-old Irish author William Butler Yeats publishes his first volume of poems, The Wanderings of Oisin
  • Essays

    Essays
    The Fabian Society publishes Essays in Socialisman influential volume of essays edited by Bernard Shaw
  • The Golden Bough

    The Golden Bough
    Scottish anthropologist James Frazer publishes The Golden Bough, a massive compilation of contemporary knowledge about ritual and religious custom The Golden Bough is a Study in Magic and Religion is a far-reaching comparative study of mythology and religion, written by Scottish anthropologist James George Frazer.
  • The Young Visiters

    The Young Visiters
    9-year-old Daisy Ashford imagines an adult romance and high society in The Young Visiters The Young Visiters o Mister Salteena's Plan es una novela de 1890 de la escritora inglesa Daisy Ashford. Lo escribió cuando tenía nueve años y parte de su atractivo radica en su inocencia juvenil y su gramática y ortografía poco convencionales. Fue reimpreso 18 veces solo en su primer año.
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray

    The Picture of Dorian Gray
    Oscar Wilde publishes his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray in which the ever-youthful hero's portrait grows old and ugly is a Gothic and philosophical novel by Oscar Wilde, first published complete in the July 1890 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.
  • Tess of the Durbervilles

    Tess of the Durbervilles
    Thomas Hardy publishes his novel Tess of the Durbervilles, with a dramatic finale at Stonehenge Tess of the d'Urbervilles también traducida al español como Tess d' Urberville y Tess de los d'Urberville es una novela del autor inglés Thomas Hardy, publicada por vez primera en 1891. Inicialmente apareció en una versión censurada y por entregas, publicada por el periódico ilustrado británico,
  • the Highland Association

     the Highland Association
    A Gaelic pressure group, the Highland Association, is founded to preserve the indigenous poetry and music of Scotland
  • Lady Windermere's Fan

    Lady Windermere's Fan
    Oscar Wilde's comedy Lady Windermere's Fan is a great success with audiences in London's St. James Theatre Lady Windermere's Fan is a four-act play by Oscar Wilde, premiered on February 20, 1892 at the St James Theater.
  • The Countess Cathleen

    The Countess Cathleen
    W.B. Yeats publishes a short play The Countess Cathleen, his first contribution to Irish poetic drama. Countess Cathleen is a verse drama by William Butler Yeats in blank verse. It was dedicated to Maud Gonne, the object of her affections for many years.
  • Widowers' Houses

    Widowers' Houses
    Bernard Shaw's first play, Widowers' Houses, deals with the serious social problem of slum landlords Widowers' Houses was the first play by George Bernard Shaw to be staged. It premièred on 9 December 1892 at the Royalty Theatre, under the auspices of the Independent Theatre Society a subscription club, formed to escape the Lord Chamberlain's Office censorship.
  • The Diary of a Nobody

    The Diary of a Nobody
    Mr Pooter is the suburban anti-hero of the The Diary of a Nobody, by George and Weedon Grossmith Diary of a Nobody or Diary of a nobody is a graphic novel written by George Grossmith and his brother Weedon with illustrations by the latter; it was first published in "Punch" in 1888-89, and published in book form in 1892. It is considered a classic work of humor.
  • Trilby

    Trilby
    French-born artist and author George du Maurier publishes his novel Trilby. In this book we are told the story of the naive, beautiful and slightly helmeted Trilby O'Ferrall, fashion designer and muse at the same time of some bohemian English painters from the legendary Paris of the mid-19th century, who, being hypnotized by the evil musician Svengali, she becomes the best singer
  • The Jungle Book

    The Jungle Book
    Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book surrounds the child Mowgli with a collection of vivid animal guardians. The Jungle Book, also known in Spanish as The Book of the Virgin Lands and The Jungle Book, published in 1894, is a collection of stories written by the Indian-born Englishman, Rudyard Kipling, the first British writer to be Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907.
  • The Importance of Being Earnest

    The Importance of Being Earnest
    Oscar Wilde's most brilliant comedy, The Importance of Being Earnest is performed in London's St. James Theatre The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde written in 1895. It is a comedy that deals with the customs and seriousness of society. It is divided into three or four acts
  • Marqués de Queensberry

    Marqués de Queensberry
    Oscar Wilde loses a libel case that he has brought against the marquess of Queensberry for describing him as a sodomite John Sholto Douglas, 9º marqués de Queensberry ​ fue un noble escocés, así como el creador de las importantes reglas del boxeo moderno conocidas como «reglas del marqués de Queensberry». Es además conocido por la ácida disputa que mantuvo con Oscar Wilde en 1895.
  • Oscar Wilde Homosexual

    Oscar Wilde Homosexual
    Oscar Wilde is sent to Reading Gaol to serve a two-year sentence with hard labour after being convicted of homosexuality
  • The Time Machine

    The Time Machine
    H.G. Wells publishes The Time Machine, a story about a Time Traveller whose first stop on his journey is the year. The Time Machine is a science fiction novel by British writer Herbert George Wells, first published in London in 1895 by William Heinemann. It consists of sixteen chapters and an epilogue.
  • A Shropshire Lad

    A Shropshire Lad
    English poet A.E. Housman publishes his first collection, A Shropshire Lad
  • Dracula

    Dracula
    English author Bram Stoker publishes Dracula, his gothic tale of vampirism in Transylvania Dracula is a novel published in 1897 by the Irishman Bram Stoker, who has turned his protagonist into the most famous vampire. The writer is said to have relied on conversations he had with a Hungarian scholar named Arminius Vámbéry, who told him about Vlad Drăculea.
  • Lamb House in Rye

    Lamb House in Rye
    Henry James moves from London to Lamb House in Rye, Sussex, which remains his home for the rest of his life Lamb House is an 18th century house located in Rye, East Sussex, England, and on the property of the National Trust. The house has literary connections. It was the home of Henry James from 1898 to 1916 and later EF Benson and Godden Rumer.
  • The War of the Worlds

    The War of the Worlds
    H.G. Wells publishes his science-fiction novel The War of the Worlds, in which Martians arrive in a rocket to invade earth War of the Worlds is a science fiction novel written by Herbert George Wells and first published in 1898, which describes a Martian invasion of Earth.
  • The Turn of the Screw

    The Turn of the Screw
    Henry James publishes The Turn of the Screw in a collection of short stories
  • The Story of the Treasure Seekers

    The Story of the Treasure Seekers
    E. Nesbit publishes The Story of the Treasure Seekers, introducing the Bastable family who feature in several of her books for children The Story of the Treasure Seekers is a novel by E. Nesbit. First published in 1899, it tells the story of Dora, Oswald, Dicky, Alice, Noel, and Horace Octavius Bastable, and their attempts to assist their widowed father and recover the fortunes of their family; its sequels are The Wouldbegoods (1901) and The New Treasure Seekers (1904).
  • Lord Jim

    Lord Jim
    Joseph Conrad publishes his novel Lord Jim about a life of failure and redemption in the far East Lord Jim es una novela escrita por Joseph Conrad y publicada originalmente en la Blackwood's Magazine entre octubre de 1899 y noviembre de 1900. La novela narra la historia de Jim, un marinero que abandona una nave en peligro y es censurado públicamente por esto, y sus intentos por aceptar su pasado y redimirse.
  • Period: to

    Modernism (1900 - Current

    British modernist authors had a sense of betrayal after being devastated by two world wars in Europe. They lost faith in their governing institutions, what they once believed in and now saw lead to bloody conflicts. They no longer saw their government or even their religions as a reliable means of giving answers in life, therefore they turned away and sought the answers for themselves. Sometimes using allegory or even fantasy to do it.
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit

    The Tale of Peter Rabbit
    Beatrix Potter publishes at her own expense The Tale of Peter Rabbit The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a children's book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter in which the protagonist, the young, mischievous and disobedient Peter Rabbit, is chased in Mr. McGregor's garden. Peter runs away and returns to his mother's house, who puts him to bed after serving him a chamomile tea.
  • Kim, Rudyard Kipling

    Kim, Rudyard Kipling
    Rudyard Kipling's experiences of India are put to good use in his novel Kim Kim is a picaresque and espionage novel by the writer Sir Rudyard Kipling. Published in 1901 by MacMillan & Co. Ltd., it is based on the political conflict in Central Asia between the Russian Empire and the British Empire, called The Great Game. Notable for the detailed portrait of the people of India.
  • Just So Stories for Little Children

    Just So Stories for Little Children
    Rudyard Kipling publishes his Just So Stories for Little Children Just So Stories for Little Children, published in Spanish as Precisamente Así, or Los cuentos de Así fue, is a collection of short stories written by Rudyard Kipling and published in 1902. They have a fantastic character, and are one of the most famous works of the Author.
  • Cathleen ni Houlihan

    Cathleen ni Houlihan
    The play Cathleen ni Houlihan, by W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, fosters Irish nationalism Cathleen ni Houlihan is a one-act play written by William Butler Yeats and Lady Gregory in 1902. It was first performed on April 2 of that year and first published in the October issue of Samhain.
  • John Masefield, Salt-Water Ballads

    John Masefield,  Salt-Water Ballads
    John Masefield's poem 'Sea Fever' is published in Salt-Water Ballads Saltwater Poems and Ballads is a book of poetry on themes of maritime history and maritime history by John Masefield. It was first published in 1916 by Macmillan, with illustrations by Charles Pears.
  • Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles

    Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles
    Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles begins publication in serial form The Hound of the Baskervilles, also translated as The Dog of the Baskervilles or The Mastiff of the Baskervilles, is the third novel by Arthur Conan Doyle that has Sherlock Holmes as its main protagonist. It was serialized in The Strand Magazine between 1901 and 1902
  • The Wings of the Dove

    The Wings of the Dove
    Henry James publishes the first of his three last novels, The Wings of the Dove It tells the story of Milly Theale, an American heiress stricken with a serious disease, and her effect on the people around her. Some of these people befriend Milly with honourable motives, while others are more self-interested.
  • Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad

    Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
    Joseph Conrad publishes a collection of stories including Heart of Darkness, a sinister tale based partly on his own journey up the Congo The Heart of Darkness is a long story or short novel from 1899 by the Polish-British writer Joseph Conrad, which addresses topics such as colonialism, the clash of cultures, racism and human violence.
  • The Riddle of the Sands

     The Riddle of the Sands
    Erskine Childers has a best-seller in The Riddle of the Sands, a thriller about a planned German invasion of Britain When Carruthers, bored with the London summer and the monotony of his job at the Foreign Office, accepts an invitation from his friend Davies to go on a Baltic cruise, he does not know that he has started an adventure as dangerous as it is extraordinary. .
  • Principia Ethica

    Principia Ethica
    British philosopher G.E. Moore publishes Principia Ethica, an attempt to apply logic to ethics Principia Ethica is a 1903 book written by the British philosopher G. E. Moore, in which Moore insists on the indefiniteness of the good and proposes an exposition of the naturalistic fallacy. The influence of Principia Ethica and its arguments were pioneers in the advancement of moral philosophy.
  • Nostromo

    Nostromo
    Joseph Conrad publishes his novel Nostromo, about a revolution in South America and a fatal horde of silver Nostromo is a political novel by the Polish-British writer Joseph Conrad, published in 1904, which deals with the affairs of a fictional republic in South America, called Costaguana. It was originally published in two volumes in T.P.'s Weekly.
  • The Ambassadors

    The Ambassadors
    Henry James publishes The Ambassadors, the second of his three last novels written in rapid succession The Ambassadors is a novel by author Henry James, published in 1903. It was initially serialized in the North American Review.
  • The Golden Bowl

    The Golden Bowl
    Henry James publishes his last completed novel, The Golden Bowl The Golden Cup is a novel by the American writer Henry James published in 1904; tells the story of an American millionaire and his daughter, whose respective spouses have been lovers before marrying them, and who are again afterwards.
  • Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up

     Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up
    J.M Barrie's play for children Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up has its premiere in London Peter Pan and Wendy, Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Didn't Want to Grow Up, is a children's play written by Scottish writer James M. Barrie.
  • Reginald

    Reginald
    Under the pseudonym Saki, H.H. Munro publishes Reginald, his first volume of short stories In the salons of the best British society, Reginald shines with his own light: elegant and scathing, frivolous and witty, no one is safe from his caustic comments and his eagerness to express opinions on anything, be it a colonial war or the latest fashion in hats.
  • Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell

    Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell
    The Bloomsbury Group gathers for informal evenings at the family home of Virginia and Vanessa Stephens (later Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell)
  • De Profundis

    De Profundis
    Oscar Wilde's De Profundis, a letter of recrimination written in Reading Gaol to Lord Alfred Douglas, is published posthumously De Profundis is the title of an epistle written by Oscar Wilde between January and March 1897 and first published by his literary executor Robert Baldwin Ross in 1905, five years after the Irish poet and playwright's death.
  • the story of a simple soul

    the story of a simple soul
    H.G. Wells publishes Kipps: the story of a simple soul, a comic novel about a bumbling draper's assistant Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul is a novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1905. Humorous but comprehensive, the perceptual social novel is generally considered a masterpiece, and it was his own favorite work. It was adapted to the stage and musical cinema Half a Sixpence.
  • Major Barbara and Man and Superman

     Major Barbara and Man and Superman
    Bernard Shaw has two new plays opening in London in the same year, Major Barbara and Man and Superman Major Barbara is a three-act English play by George Bernard Shaw, written and premiered in 1905 and first published in 1907. The story concerns an idealistic young woman, Barbara Undershaft, who is engaged in helping the poor as a Major in the Salvation Army in London.
  • The Scarlet Pimpernel

    The Scarlet Pimpernel
    Sir Percy Blakeney rescues aristocrats from the guillotine in Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel. The Scarlet Pimpernel is a swashbuckling novel by Emma Orczy, a British baroness of Hungarian origin. It was published in London in 1905.
  • Joseph Dent

    Joseph Dent
    The first volume of the inexpensive Everyman's Library is issued by Joseph Dent, a London publisher Edward Joseph Dent was a British musicologist and music historian.
  • The Railway Children

    The Railway Children
    E. Nesbit publishes The Railway Children, the most successful of her books featuring the Bastable family is a children's book by writer Edith Nesbit, written in English, originally serialized in "The London Magazine" during 1905 and first published in book form in 1906.
  • The Man of Property

    The Man of Property
    John Galsworthy publishes The Man of Property, the first of his novels chronicling the family of Soames Forsyte. John Galsworthy achieved fame with the publication in 1906 of the novel "The Owner", which sixteen years later would become the first of those that make up "The Saga of the Forsyte". "The owner" begins in its first chapter with an important satirical verve that, through images taken from the animal world, presents the Forsyte as a family or social class that is considered immortal.
  • The Western World

    The Western World
    J.M. Synge's Playboy of the Western World provokes violent reactions at its Dublin premiere The Western World's Playboy, The Western World's Faker, The Western World's Braggart or The Western World's Champion is a play by Irish playwright John Millington Synge, premiered at the Abbey Theater in Dublin in 1907.
  • Father and Son: A Study of Two Temperaments

    Father and Son: A Study of Two Temperaments
    Edmund Gosse publishes Father and Son, an account of his difficult relationship with his fundamentalist father, Philip Gosse Father and Son es una memoria del poeta y crítico Edmund Gosse, que él subtituló "un estudio de dos temperamentos". Edmund había publicado previamente una biografía de su padre, publicado originalmente de forma anónima.
  • Dubliners

    Dubliners
    James Joyce completes the 15 short stories eventually published in 1914 as Dubliners
  • The Wind in the Willows

    The Wind in the Willows
    Rat, Mole and Toad, in Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows, appeal to a wide readership. The Wind in the Willows is a novel written by Scottish writer Kenneth Grahame. Published in 1908, its success soon made it a classic in English-language children's literature.
  • The Autobiography of a Super Tramp

    The Autobiography of a Super Tramp
    The Welsh poet W.H. Davies has a success with The Autobiography of a Super-Tramp, his account of life on the road and in dosshouses. The Autobiography of a Super Tramp is the 1908 autobiography of the Welsh poet and writer W. H. Davies. Much of the book deals with and describes the lifestyle of a homeless man in the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States in the last decade of the 19th century.
  • The Beast

    The Beast
    British author Evelyn Waugh publishes a classic Fleet Street novel, Scoop, introducing Lord Copper, proprietor of The Beast Emile Zola's novel is the basis for this film, in which a bitter machinist feels a compulsion to kill.
  • Ann Veronica

    Ann Veronica
    The heroine of H.G. Wells' novel Ann Veronica is a determined example of the New Woman Ann Veronica is a novel written by H. G. Wells and published in 1909. It deals with the life of twenty-one-year-old Ann Veronica Stanley, who rebels against the restrictions of her authoritarian father. The novel questions the patriarchal system of the time, showing the difficult situation of women.
  • Cargoes

    Cargoes
    In his poem Cargoes John Masefield compares a 'dirty British coaster' with two romantic boats from the past
  • Prester John

    Prester John
    John Buchan publishes Prester John, the first of his adventure stories Prester John was the name of a supposed Christian ruler of the Far East according to European accounts of the Middle Ages. He was a well-known character between the 12th and 17th centuries.
  • The History of Mr Polly

    The History of Mr Polly
    H.G. Wells publishes The History of Mr Polly, a novel about an escape from drab everyday existence The story of Mr. Polly is a comic novel
  • If

     If
    Rudyard Kipling publishes If, which rapidly becomes his most popular poem among the British. "If ..." is a poem written in 1895 by the English author Rudyard Kipling that conforms to the rules of British behavior. It is written in a fatherly tone, as advice to the author's son, John. "Yes ..." is a literary example of Victorian Stoicism.
  • Howard's End

     Howard's End
    E.M. Forster publishes Howard's End, his novel about the Schlegel sisters and the Wilcox family During an excursion to Spira, sisters Margaret and Helen Schlegel make friends with the Wilcoxes. Helen, the younger of the two, is invited to spend a few days at Howards End, the rural mansion of her new friends.
  • The White Peacock

    The White Peacock
    D.H. Lawrence's career as a writer is launched with the publication of his first novel, The White Peacock The White Peacock is the first novel by D. H. Lawrence, published in 1911, albeit with 1910 on the cover. Lawrence started the novel in 1906 and then rewrote it three times. The first versions had the working title of Laetitia. Maurice Greiffenhagen's 1891 painting 'An Idyll' inspired the novel.
  • Rupert Brooke - Poems

    Rupert Brooke - Poems
    Rupert Brooke publishes Poems, the only collection to appear before his early death in World War I
    -The Great Lover-The Soldier-The Dead-Heaven-The Old Vicarage, Grantchester
  • The Innocence of Father Brown

    The Innocence of Father Brown
    G.K. Chesterton's clerical detective makes his first appearance in The Innocence of Father Brown. The Innocence of Father Brown is the first collection of stories starring Father Brown, a short, stumpy Catholic priest with shapeless clothes and a large umbrella, and uncanny insight into human evil.
  • In a German Pension is New

    In a German Pension is New
    In a German Pension is New Zealand author Katherine Mansfield's first collection of stories Katherine Mansfield is the pseudonym used by Kathleen Beauchamp, a leading modernist writer of New Zealand origin.
  • Zuleika Dobson

    Zuleika Dobson
    Max Beerbohm publishes his novel Zuleika Dobson, in which the beauty of his heroine causes havoc among the students at Oxford Zuleika Dobson, full title Zuleika Dobson, or, An Oxford Love Story, is Max Beerbohm's only novel, a satire of college life in Oxford published in 1911. It includes the famous line "Death cancels all engagements" and presents a corrosive view of Edwardian Oxford.
  • Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Ludwig Wittgenstein
    Ludwig Wittgenstein moves to Cambridge to study philosophy under Bertrand Russell Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein was an Austrian philosopher, mathematician, linguist and logician, later a British national. He published the Tractatus logico-philosophicus, which greatly influenced the logical positivists of the Vienna Circle, a movement of which he was never considered a member.
  • The Listeners

    The Listeners
    Walter De la Mare establishes his reputation with the title poem of his collection The Listeners The Listeners is a 1972 science fiction novel by American author James Gunn. It focuses on the search for interstellar communication and the effect of receiving a message.
  • New Statesman

    New Statesman
    The first issue of the New Statesman is published by Beatrice and Sidney Webb New Statesman is a British political and cultural magazine published in London. Founded as a weekly journal of politics and literature on April 12, 1913, it was connected to Sidney and Beatrice Webb, and other prominent members of the Fabian Society. They had supported The New Age, a magazine edited by A. R
  • Sinister Street

    Sinister Street
    Compton Mackenzie publishes the first volume of his autobiographical novel Sinister Street Sinister Street is a 1913-1914 novel by Compton Mackenzie. It is a kind of bildungsroman or novel about growth, and it concerns two children, Michael Fane and his sister Stella. They are both born out of wedlock, something that was frowned upon at the time, but from wealthy parents
  • Principia Mathematica

    Principia Mathematica
    Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell complete a work of mathematical logic, Principia Mathematica Principia mathematica is a set of three books with the foundations of mathematics written by Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead and published between 1910 and 1913.
  • Sons and Lovers

     Sons and Lovers
    D.H. Lawrence publishes a semi-autobiographical novel about the Morel family, Sons and Lovers Sons and Lovers is a novel by English author D. H. Lawrence, published in 1913. The Modern Library ranked it 9th on its list of 100 best novels of the 20th century.
  • Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

    Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
    James Joyce's novel Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man begins serial publication in a London journal, The Egoist. Portrait of the Adolescent Artist is a semi-autobiographical novel written by the Irish writer James Joyce, published in serial format in The Egoist magazine, between 1914 and 1915, and as a book in 1916.
  • Dubliners

    Dubliners
    After years of delay James Joyce's Dubliners, a collection of short stories, is published Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories by Irish writer James Joyce. After various vicissitudes, it was published in 1914
  • Thomas Stearns Eliot

     Thomas Stearns Eliot
    American-born poet Thomas Stearns Eliot crosses the Atlantic to England, making it his home for the rest of his life. Thomas Stearns Eliot, known as T. S. Eliot, was a British-American poet, playwright, and literary critic. It represented one of the summits of poetry in the English language of the 20th century.According to José María Valverde, in effect, “the publication of La tierra baldía makes T. S.
  • The Times Literary Supplement

    The Times Literary Supplement
    The Times Literary Supplement is published in London as an independent paper, separate from The Times The Times Literary Supplement is a weekly literary magazine published in London by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation.
  • Ragged Trousered

    Ragged Trousered
    Robert Tressell's Ragged Trousered Philanthropists is published posthumously in an abbreviated version The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists is a semi-autobiographical novel by Irish house painter and sign writer Robert Noonan, who wrote the book in his spare time under the pseudonym Robert Tressell.
  • Of Human Bondage

    Of Human Bondage
    Somerset Maugham publishes his semi-autobiographical novel Of Human Bondage. Of Human Bondage es una novela de 1915 de W. Somerset Maugham. En general, se acepta que es su obra maestra y que es de naturaleza fuertemente autobiográfica, aunque Maugham declaró: "Esta es una novela, no una autobiografía; aunque gran parte de ella es autobiográfica, más es pura invención".
  • The Voyage Out

    The Voyage Out
    The English writer Virginia Woolf publishes her first novel, The Voyage Out End of Journey is the first novel published by Virginia Woolf in 1915 by her half-brother's publishing house, Gerald Duckworth and Company Ltd; published in the United States in 1920 by Doran. It is one of Woolf's cleverest social satires.
  • The Rainbow

    The Rainbow
    D.H. Lawrence's novel about the Brangwen family, The Rainbow, is seized by the police as an obscene work El arco iris (1915) by D. H. Lawrence –which we present for the first time in its entirety in Spanish, in a new translation by Catalina Martínez Muñoz– tells the story of a family over three generations, from the 1840s to 1905.
  • Thirty-Nine Steps

    Thirty-Nine Steps
    Secret agent Richard Hannay makes his first appearance in John Buchan's Thirty-Nine Steps The Thirty-Nine Steps is an adventure novel by Scottish author John Buchan. It first appeared as a series in Blackwood's Magazine in August and September 1915 before being published in book form in October of that year by William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh.
  • 1914 and Other Poems

    1914 and Other Poems
    Rupert Brooke's 1914 and Other Poems is published a few months after his death in Greece
  • Over the Brazier

    Over the Brazier
    Robert Graves publishes his first book of poems, Over the Brazier Robert von Ranke Graves fue un escritor y erudito británico. Popular por novelas históricas llevadas a la televisión como Yo, Claudio, además de poeta ha destacado como investigador de los mitos griegos y la figura de La diosa blanca. Es padre de la escritora y traductora Lucía Graves.
  • 'Saki' is killed

    'Saki' is killed
    The author H.H. Munro ('Saki') is killed by a sniper's bullet on a battlefield in France In November 1916 he was sheltering in a shell crater near Beaumont-Hamel, France, during the Battle of the Ancre, when he was killed by a German sniper. According to several sources, his last words were "Put that bloody cigarette out!" Munro has no known grave.
  • The Man with Two Left Feet

    The Man with Two Left Feet
    Jeeves and Bertie Wooster make their first appearance in P.G. Wodehouse's The Man with Two Left Feet The Man with Two Left Feet, and Other Stories is a collection of short stories by British author PG Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on March 8, 1917 by Methuen & Co., London, and in the United States on March 1 February 1933 by AL Burt and Co., New York.
  • Eminent Victorians

    Eminent Victorians
    Lytton Strachey fails to show conventional respect to four famous Victorians in his influential volume of short biographies entitled Eminent Victorians When eminent Victorians appeared in England in 1918, its author, Lytton Strachey, was a complete stranger to the public. He was thirty-eight years old and had yet to write anything that justified his friends' expectations or his own.
  • The Return of the Soldier

    The Return of the Soldier
    Rebecca West publishes her first novel, The Return of the Soldier Return of the Soldier is the debut novel by English novelist Rebecca West, first published in 1918. The novel chronicles the return of the projectile that surprised Captain Chris Baldry from the trenches of World War I from the perspective of his cousin Jenny. .
  • In The Economic Consequences of the Peace

    In The Economic Consequences of the Peace
    In The Economic Consequences of the Peace Maynard Keynes publishes a strong attack on the reparations demanded from Germany The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919) is a book written and published by the British economist John Maynard Keynes. ... The perception by much of the British public that Germany had been treated unfairly was, in turn, a crucial factor in later public support for the appeasement of Hitler.
  • Bull-dog Drummond

    Bull-dog Drummond
    Sapper's patriotic hero makes his first appearance, taking on the villainous Carl Peterson in Bull-dog Drummond Bull-dog Drummond was the first Bulldog Drummond novel. It was published in 1920 and written by H. C. McNeile under the pseudonym Sapper.
  • Women in Love

    Women in Love
    D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love, a continuation of the family story in The Rainbow, is published first in the USA Friends Rupert Birkin and Gerald Crich begin an affair with sisters Ursula and Gudrun Brangwen. After getting married, couples go on their honeymoon, but things get complicated on the trip.
  • The Mysterious Affair at Styles

    The Mysterious Affair at Styles
    The Belgian detective Hercule Poirot features in Agatha Christie's first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. El misterioso caso de Styles es la primera novela de ficción detectivesca de la escritora británica Agatha Christie, escrita a mediados de la Primera Guerra Mundial en 1916,
  • Rain - Somerset Maugham

    Rain - Somerset Maugham
    Somerset Maugham's short story 'Rain' (in his collection The Trembling of a Leaf) introduces the lively American prostitute Sadie Thompson "Rain" is a short story by the British writer W. Somerset Maugham. It was originally published as "Miss Thompson" in the April 1921 issue of the American literary magazine The Smart Set.
  • Tractatus Logico Philosophicus

    Tractatus Logico Philosophicus
    Ludwig Wittgenstein publishes his influential study of the philosophy of logic, Tractatus Logico Philosophicus The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is the title of a work by Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein. The result of his notes and correspondence with Bertrand Russell, George Edward Moore and Keynes, written between 1914–1916, while serving as a lieutenant in the Austro-Hungarian army and, later, as a prisoner of war in Italy, during the First World War.
  • The Forsyte Saga

    The Forsyte Saga
    John Galsworthy publishes his novels about the Forsyte family as a joint collection under the title The Forsyte Saga The Forsyte Saga is a series of three novels and two intermissions published between 1906 and 1921 by John Galsworthy. It tells the vicissitudes of the main members of an upper-middle-class British family
  • The Waste Land

    The Waste Land
    American-born poet T.S. Eliot publishes The Waste Land, an extremely influential poem in five fragmented sections The Wasteland, the masterpiece of T. S. Eliot, is one of the most important poems in twentieth-century English literature. It consists of 434 verses, the first of which is quoted on numerous occasions: "April is the cruelest month."
  • Whose Body?

    Whose Body?
    The gentleman detective Lord Peter Wimsey makes his first appearance in Dorothy Sayers' Whose Body? Whose body is it? is a 1923 mystery novel by Dorothy L. Sayers, in which she introduced the character of Lord Peter Wimsey.
  • Saint Joan

    Saint Joan
    Bernard Shaw's play Saint Joan has its world premiere in New York Saint Joan is a play, in six scenes and an epilogue, by the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, premiered in 1923.
  • A Passage to India

    A Passage to India
    E.M. Forster's novel A Passage to India builds on cultural misconceptions between the British and Indian communities. Passage to India is a novel by English author EM Forster set in the British Raj and the Indian independence movement in the 1920s. It was selected as one of the 100 best works of English literature by the Modern Library and won the Prize James Tait Black Memorial from 1924 for fiction.
  • When We Were Very Young

    When We Were Very Young
    Christopher Robin features for the first time in A.A. Milne's When We Were Very Young When We Were Very Young is a best-selling poetry book by A. A. Milne. It was first published in 1924, and was illustrated by E. H. Shepard. Several of the verses were set to music by Harold Fraser-Simson.
  • Pastors and Masters

    Pastors and Masters
    English writer Ivy Compton-Burnett finds her characteristic voice in her second novel, Pastors and Masters Pastors and Masters is a short novel by Ivy Compton-Burnett published in 1925. Called "a work of genius" by The New Statesman, it was the author's second novel and the first in which she introduced the signature style of precise, clipped dialogue. which was to make his name.
  • Mrs Dalloway

    Mrs Dalloway
    Virginia Woolf publishes her novel Mrs Dalloway, in which the action is limited to a single day. Mrs. Dalloway is Virginia Woolf's fourth novel, published on May 14, 1925. It details a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, in post-World War I England.
  • The Preservation of Rural England

    The Preservation of Rural England
    Patrick Abercrombie publishes The Preservation of Rural England, calling for rural planning to prevent the encroachment of towns Campaign to Protect Rural England is a registered charity with over 60,000 members and supporters. It was formed in 1926 by Patrick Abercrombie to limit urban sprawl, the ERCP claims to be one of the largest environmental groups.
  • Seven Pillars of Wisdom

    Seven Pillars of Wisdom
    T.E. Lawrence publishes privately his autobiographical Seven Pillars of Wisdom, describing his part in the Arab uprising. The Seven Pillars of Wisdom is the last book by Thomas Edward Lawrence, where he recounts his military and human experience during the war of the British, French and Arabs against Turks and Germans, during the First World War.
  • Winnie-the-Pooh

    Winnie-the-Pooh
    Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore and the others make their first appearance in A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh. Winnie-the-Pooh is a best-selling classic children's book. It is the first volume of stories about Winnie-the-Pooh, written by A. A. Milne and illustrated by E. H. Shepard.
  • A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle

    A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle
    Hugh MacDiarmid writes his long poem A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle in a revived version of the Lallans dialect of the Scottish borders. A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle is a long poem by Hugh MacDiarmid written in Scottish and published in 1926. It is composed as a form of monologue influenced by the stream of consciousness writing genres.
  • Tarka the Otter

    Tarka the Otter
    Henry Williamson wins a wide readership with Tarka the Otter, a realistic story of the life and death of an otter in Devon Tarka the Otter: His Joyful Water-Life and Death in the Country of the Two Rivers is a novel by Henry Williamson, first published in 1927 by G.P. The Sons of Putnam with an introduction by H.E. Sir John Fortescue. It won the Hawthornden Prize in 1928, and it has never been sold out since its first publication.
  • To The Lighthouse

    To The Lighthouse
    Virginia Woolf uses a Hebridean holiday as the setting for her narrative in To The Lighthouse. To the lighthouse is Virginia Woolf's fifth novel, published on May 5, 1927. This novel is a landmark of high modernism. The text, focusing on the Ramsay family and their visits to the Isle of Skye in Scotland between 1910 and 1920, cleverly manipulates time and psychological exploration.
  • Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man

    Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man
    Siegfried Sassoon publishes Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, the first volume of a semi-autobiographical trilogy
  • The Hotel

    The Hotel
    Anglo-Irish author Elizabeth Bowen publishes her first novel, The Hotel
  • Postures - Jean Rhys

    Postures - Jean Rhys
    Caribbean-born author Jean Rhys publishes her first novel, Postures, based on her affair with the writer Ford Madox Ford
  • Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man

    Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man
    Siegfried Sassoon publishes Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, the first volume of a semi-autobiographical trilogy Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man is a novel by Siegfried Sassoon, first published in 1928 by Faber and Faber. He won the Hawthornden Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, being immediately recognized as a classic of English literature.
  • Journey's End

    Journey's End
    Set in a World War I trench, the play Journey's End reflects the wartime experiences of its British author, R.C. Sherriff Journey's End , a 1928 dramatic play by English playwright R. C. Sherriff, is set in the trenches near Saint-Quentin, Aisne towards the end of the First World War.
  • Decline and Fall

     Decline and Fall
    Evelyn Waugh succeeds with a comic first novel, Decline and Fall Decline and Fall is a novel by English author Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1928. It was Waugh's first published novel; an earlier attempt, titled The Temple at Thatch, was destroyed by Waugh while it was still in manuscript form.
  • The Well of Loneliness

     The Well of Loneliness
    Radclyffe Hall's novel The Well of Loneliness is the first to deal openly with a lesbian subject The Well of Solitude is a lesbian-themed novel from 1928, written by the English-born author Marguerite Radclyffe Hall. This novel is about the life of Stephen Mary Olivia Gertrude Gordon, an English woman of high social class whose homosexuality is evident at a young age.
  • A High Wind in Jamaica

    A High Wind in Jamaica
    Richard Hughes publishes his first novel, A High Wind in Jamaica In Jamaica, in the mid-nineteenth century, the five children of the English Bas-Thornton family and the two of the Fernández Creole family lived in "a kind of paradise." But after an earthquake and hurricane have reduced their family's possessions to rubble, they are sent to England for their education.
  • Blind Fireworks

    Blind Fireworks
    Blind Fireworks is Ulster writer Louis MacNeice's first collection of poems described in biography. In Louis MacNeice. MacNeice's first book of poetry, Blind Fireworks, appeared in 1929, followed by more than a dozen other volumes, such as Poems (1935), Autumn Journal (1939), Collected Poems, 1925–1948 (1949), and, posthumously, The Burning Perch (1963).
  • The Good Companions

    The Good Companions
    English author J.B. Priestley has an immediate success with his first novel, The Good Companions. The Good Companions is a novel by the English author J. B. Priestley. Written in 1929, it follows the fate of a concert party on a tour of England. It is Priestley's most famous novel, and it established him as a national figure. It won the James Tait Black Memorial Award and was adapted twice for film.
  • Goodbye to All That

    Goodbye to All That
    English poet Robert Graves puts behind him an England he dislikes in his autobiography, Goodbye to All That Good-Bye to All That is an autobiography by Robert Graves which first appeared in 1929, when the author was 34 years old. "It was my bitter leave-taking of England," he wrote in a prologue to the revised second edition of 1957, "where I had recently broken a good many conventions".
  • Swallows and Amazons

    Swallows and Amazons
    Swallows and Amazons is the first of Arthur Ransome's adventure stories for children Swallows and Amazons is the first book in the Swallows and Amazons series by English author Arthur Ransome; it was first published on December 1, 1930, and the action took place in the summer of 1929 in the Lake District.
  • Private Lives

    Private Lives
    Noel Coward and Gertrude Lawrence star in the West End in Private Lives, Coward's comedy of marital complications Private Lives is a 1930 comedy of manners in three acts by Noël Coward. It concerns a divorced couple who, while honeymooning with their new spouses, discover that they are staying in adjacent rooms at the same hotel.
  • Murder at the Vicarage

    Murder at the Vicarage
    Agatha Christie's Miss Marple makes her first appearance, in Murder at the Vicarage Death in the Vicarage is a mystery novel by British writer Agatha Christie, published in 1930 by the Collins Crime Club and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company later in the same year. It is the first novel to introduce the character of Miss Marple and the people of St. Mary Mead.
  • The Waves

    The Waves
    Virginia Woolf publishes the most fluid of her novels, The Waves, in which she tells the story through six interior monologues The Waves is Virginia Woolf's seventh novel, published on October 8, 1931. It is Woolf's most experimental novel. It is made up of soliloquies of the six characters in the book: Bernard, Susan, Rhoda, Neville, Jinny and Louis.
  • Conquistador

    Conquistador
    US poet Archibald MacLeish publishes a narrative epic, Conquistador, about the conquest of Mexico
  • The Screwtape Letters

    The Screwtape Letters
    British author C.S. Lewis publishes a moral parable, The Screwtape Letters, about the problems confronting a trainee devil. Letters from the devil to his nephew is a satirical work, Christian apologetics, by the British author C. S. Lewis.
  • Brave New World

    Brave New World
    British author Aldous Huxley gives a bleak view of a science-based future in his novel Brave New World. Brave New World is the most famous novel by British writer Aldous Huxley, first published in 1932. The novel is a dystopia that anticipates the development of reproductive technology, human cultivation and hypnopedia, managing emotions through drugs that, combined , radically change society.
  • Period: to

    Victorian (1832 - 1899)

    Beginning with the coronation of Queen Victoria and culminating in the year of her death, the Victorian era saw a battle between ideas from others timespan. In this time, the middle class outnumbered the nobles. Many members of the upper middle class felt they could join the ranks of their superiors and focused on acting like the dignitaries of the time. The characters and authors of this time period are often stereotyped for being tight-fisted, hypocritical, and narrow-minded.
  • Glastonbury Romance

    Glastonbury Romance
    John Cowper Powys's novel A Glastonbury Romance is published first in New York A Glastonbury Romance was written by John Cowper Powys in rural New York and first published by Simon and Schuster in New York City in March 1932. An English edition published by John Lane followed in 1933.
  • The Shape of Things to Come

    The Shape of Things to Come
    H.G. Wells publishes The Shape of Things to Come, a novel in which he accurately predicts a renewal of world war The Shape of Things to Come is a work of science fiction by British writer H. G. Wells, published in 1933, which speculates on future events up to the year 2106. A long economic slump causes a major war that leaves Europe devastated and threatened by plague.
  • The Pylons

    The Pylons
    The Pylon group of British poets get their name from Stephen Spender's poem 'The Pylons'
  • Frost in May.

    Frost in May.
    English author Antonia White publishes an autobiographical first novel, Frost in May. Frost in May is a 1933 novel by British author Antonia White that was republished in 1978 as the first book in the Virago Press Modern Classics book series by careless authors.
  • In Down and Out in Paris and London

    In Down and Out in Paris and London
    In Down and Out in Paris and London English author George Orwell writes a sympathetic account of the people he meets on hard times Sin Blanca in Paris and London is the vivid account of Orwell's time among the poorest in society, a journey through the underworld. It was the first work Orwell published, written when he was a first-time writer, and it tells of his first contact with poverty.
  • I, Claudius

    I, Claudius
    In I, Claudius the autobiography of the Roman emperor is ghost-written by Robert Graves Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, Roman historian and politician, was the fourth Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, and ruled from January 24, 41, until his death in 54. Born in Lugdunum, in Gaul , was the first Roman emperor born outside the Italian peninsula. Fecha de nacimiento: 1 de agosto de 10 a. C.
    Fallecimiento: 13 de octubre de 54 d. C.
  • A Handful of Dust

    A Handful of Dust
    In A Handful of Dust Evelyn Waugh sends his hero Tony Last to a disastrous fate, far away in the Amazon rain forest. A Handful of Dust is a novel by British writer Evelyn Waugh. Published in 1934, it is often grouped with the author's early satirical novels for which she became famous in the years leading up to World War II.
  • Murder in the Cathedral

    Murder in the Cathedral
    T.S. Eliot's play Murder in the Cathedral has its first performance in Canterbury cathedral. Murder in the Cathedral is a poetic drama by TS Eliot, first performed in 1935, portraying the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170. Eliot was largely based on a writing by Edward Grim, a clergyman who witnessed the event.
  • The General Theory of Employment

    The General Theory of Employment
    John Maynard Keynes defines his economics in The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money is considered the most outstanding work of the British economist John Maynard Keynes. To a large extent, it created the terminology of modern macroeconomics. It was published in February 1936, at a time marked by the Great Depression.
  • Language, Truth and Logic

    Language, Truth and Logic
    In Language, Truth and Logic 26-year-old A.J. Ayer produces a classic exposition of Logical Positivism "With this we complement the dethroning of speculative philosophy. We are now in a position to see that the function of philosophy is entirely critical. What exactly does its critical activity consist of?"
  • French without Tears

    French without Tears
    Terence Rattigan's first play, French without Tears, is performed in London. French Without Tears is a play by British playwright Terence Rattigan released in 1936.
  • in The Happy Return 1937

    in The Happy Return 1937
    C.S. Forester's central character, Horatio Hornblower, features for the first time – in The Happy Return. The Happy Return was the first of Forester's Hornblower novels to be published,
  • The Road to Wigan Pier

    The Road to Wigan Pier
    George Orwell reveals the harsh realities of contemporary British life in The Road to Wigan Pier The Road to Wigan Pier in English, is a play written by George Orwell. It is an account of his experiences during a trip to the north of England, which he made with the intention of knowing the living conditions of the working class in areas of strong industrialization, as well as with highly developed mining.
  • Homage to Catalonia - George Orwell

    Homage to Catalonia - George Orwell
    In Homage to Catalonia George Orwell describes his experiences fighting for the International Brigade in the Spanish Civil War. Tribute to Catalonia is George Orwell's personal account of his experience during the Spanish Civil War, written in the first person. The first edition was published in 1938.
  • Brighton Rock

    Brighton Rock
    British author Graham Greene publishes Brighton Rock, a novel following 17-year-old Pinkie in the criminal underworld of the seaside town Brighton rock is a crime novel written by British novelist Graham Greene and first published in 1938. It is set in the popular English seaside resort of Brighton, located fifty miles south of London on the south coast of England.
  • Rebecca

    Rebecca
    Maxim de Winter's house, Manderley, holds dark secrets in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, Rebecca was the third novel published by the English novelist Daphne Du Maurier in 1938.
  • Goodbye to Berlin

    Goodbye to Berlin
    British author Christopher Isherwood publishes his novel Goodbye to Berlin, based on his own experiences in the city. Christopher, a young British man, rents a room in the German capital and teaches English classes for a living. This work and his curiosity as a budding writer will lead him to meet characters of all types and conditions
  • At Swim-Two-Birds

    At Swim-Two-Birds
    Irish author Flann O'Brien publishes his first novel, At Swim-Two-Birds. In Swimming-two-birds it is a book as surprising and original as its own title: as incomprehensible for the Spanish reader as it is for the English. This novel is considered one of the masterpieces of 20th century narrative and whoever enters it will find the wonderful world of O'Brien
  • Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats

    Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
    T.S. Eliot gives cats a poetic character in Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats. Old Possum's Book of Skillful Cats is a collection of humorous and fanciful poems by T. S. Eliot on feline psychology and sociology, published by Faber and Faber. This book has served as the basis for the production of the musical Cats.
  • The Third Policeman

    The Third Policeman
    Flann O'Brien's The Third Policeman is rejected by numerous publishers before becoming, decades later, his best-known novel. The Third Police is a novel by Irish author Brian O'Nolan, who published it under the pseudonym Flann O'Brien. It was written between 1939 and 1940, but its author could not find a publisher, so he withdrew the manuscript from circulation and claimed to have lost it. At his death in 1966, the book remained unpublished.
  • Black Lamb and Grey Falcon

    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon
    British author Rebecca West publishes an account of Yugoslavia, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon. Black Lamb and Gray Falcon: A Journey Through Yugoslavia is a travel book written by Dame Rebecca West, published in 1941 in two volumes by Macmillan in the United Kingdom and by The Viking Press in the United States.
  • Five on a Treasure Island

    Five on a Treasure Island
    English children's author Enid Blyton introduces the Famous Five in Five on a Treasure Island. The Five and the Island Treasure is the first book in Enid Blyton's The Five series, published in 1942.
  • Four Quartets.

    Four Quartets.
    The separate poems forming T.S. Eliot's Four Quartets are brought together for the first time as a single volume, published in New York. Four Quartets is the title with which the Anglo-American poet, playwright and critic T. S. Eliot collected four long poems in book form. The four poems had been published separately between 1936 and 1942, being republished in 1943.
  • The Pursuit of Love

    The Pursuit of Love
    English author Nancy Mitford has her first success with the novel The Pursuit of Love. In Love Hunt, her most successful novel, Nancy Mitford uses real elements from her quirky and famous family to build the tale. The action opens in Alconleigh's living room, the Radletts' country home.
  • Brideshead Revisited

    Brideshead Revisited
    Evelyn Waugh publishes Brideshead Revisited, a novel about a rich Catholic family in England between the wars. Brideshead Revisited, the Sacred and Profane Memories of Capt. Charles Ryder is a novel by Evelyn Waugh, first edited in 1945
  • Animal Farm

    Animal Farm
    In George Orwell's fable Animal Farm a ruthless pig, Napoleon, controls the farmyard using the techniques of Stalin. Farm Rebellion is a satirical novella by British writer George Orwell. Published in 1945, the work is a scathing fable about how the Soviet regime of Joseph Stalin corrupts socialism.
  • Titus Groan

    Titus Groan
    Titus Groan begins British author Mervyn Peake's trilogy of gothic novels. Titus Groan is a novel by Mervyn Peake. It is the first novel in the Gormenghast series.
  • Under the Volcano

    Under the Volcano
    English author and alcoholic Malcolm Lowry publishes an autobiographical novel, Under the Volcano Under The Volcano is a novel, partly autobiographical, written by the English writer Malcolm Lowry in 1947. Raúl Ortiz y Ortiz made the first Spanish translation in 1964 for Ediciones Era. Lowry began writing the work when he was 26 years and took ten years to complete.
  • An Inspector Calls

    An Inspector Calls
    J.B. Priestley challenges audiences with An Inspector Calls, a play in which moral guilt spreads like an infection.
    An Inspector Has Arrived is a work by John Boynton Priestley in 1946. Together with the book Three Pieces on Time Once, it focuses on reflection on the problem of time and its social concerns.
  • The Lady's Not For Burning

    The Lady's Not For Burning
    Christopher Fry's verse drama The Lady's Not For Burning engages in high-spirited poetic word play. The Lady's Not for Burning is a 1948 work by Christopher Fry. A romantic comedy in three acts, in verse, takes place in the Middle Ages.
  • Enid Blyton

    Enid Blyton
    Enid Blyton introduces her most successful character, Noddy, a small boy who can't avoid nodding when he speaks Enid Mary Blyton was an English writer who produced multiple works of children's literature, including the series The Five, Secret, The Seven Secrets, Mystery and Malory Towers.
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four

     Nineteen Eighty-Four
    George Orwell publishes Nineteen Eighty-Four, a novel set in a terrifying totalitarian state of the future, watched over by Big Brother
    Nineteen Eighty-Four is a dystopian fictional political novel, written by George Orwell between 1947 and 1948 and published on June 8, 1949.
  • the chronicles of narnia the lion the witch and the wardrobe cs lewis

    the chronicles of narnia the lion the witch and the wardrobe cs lewis
    C.S. Lewis gives the first glimpse of Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Four children travel through a wardrobe to the land of Narnia, where they will have incredible adventures with the help of the lion Aslan.
  • The Grass is Singing

    The Grass is Singing
    British author Doris Lessing publishes her first novel, The Grass is Singing. A murder is the starting point of this novel published in 1950, the first by Doris Lessing, an author who was awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize for Literature and recently the Nobel Prize.
  • The Day of the Triffids - John Wyndham

    The Day of the Triffids -  John Wyndham
    British author John Wyndham creates a dark fantasy in his novel The Day of the Triffids. The Day of the Triffids is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel written by the British John Wyndham and published in 1951.
  • The Buildings of England

    The Buildings of England
    British art historian Nikolaus Pevsner undertakes a massive task, a county-by-county description of The Buildings of England. The Pevsner Architectural Guides are a series of guides to the architecture of Great Britain and Ireland. Started in the 1940s by art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the 46 volumes of the original Buildings of England series were published between 1951 and 1974.
  • Sword of Honour

    Sword of Honour
    Evelyn Waugh publishes Men at Arms, the first novel in the Sword of Honour trilogy based on his wartime experiences Sword of Honour is a trilogy of novels written by Evelyn Waugh. It consists of three novels, Men at Arms, Officers and Gentlemen and Unconditional Surrender. Published in The End of the Battle in the USA, in her arguments Waugh describes experiences of the Second World War.
  • The Go-Between

    The Go-Between
    English author L.P. Hartley sets his novel The Go-Between in the summer of 1900 The Go-Between is a novel by L.P. Hartley published in 1953. His best known work has been adapted several times for stage and screen. The book offers a critical view of society at the end of the Victorian era through the eyes of a naive outsider.
  • Under Milk Wood

    Under Milk Wood
    Dylan Thomas's 'play for voices', Under Milk Wood, is broadcast on BBC radio, with Richard Burton as narrator Under the milk forest or Under the milk forest is a radio drama piece by the Welsh writer Dylan Thomas, later adapted for its representation in the theater. There is also a 1972 film adaptation, with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, directed by Andrew Sinclair.
  • The Second World War - Winston Churchill

    The Second World War - Winston Churchill
    Politician and author Winston Churchill completes his six-volume history The Second World War. World War II is the title of the six-volume historical literary work that chronicles the period from the end of World War I to July 1945, written by Winston Churchill. This book was the main responsible for obtaining by its author the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953.
  • Under the Net.

    Under the Net.
    Anglo-Irish novelist Iris Murdoch publishes her first novel, Under the Net. Under the Net is the first novel by Iris Murdoch, published in 1954. Set in London, it is the story of a young writer, Jake Donaghue. Its mixture of the philosophical and the picaresque has made it one of Murdoch's most popular work. He dedicated the novel to Raymond Queneau.
  • Lucky Jim - Kingsley Amis

    Lucky Jim - Kingsley Amis
    English author Kingsley Amis's first novel, Lucky Jim, strikes an anti-establishment chord Jim's Luck is a novel written by Kingsley Amis and published in 1954 by Victor Gollancz. It was Amis's first novel, and with it, she won the Somerset Maugham Prize for fiction.
  • Lord of the Flies - William Golding

    Lord of the Flies - William Golding
    William Golding gives a chilling account of schoolboy savagery in his first novel, Lord of the Flies Lord of the Flies is William Golding's first and most famous novel. Published in 1954, it is considered a classic of postwar English literature. It had hardly any circulation in the year of its publication, maintaining a low volume of sales.
  • Angry Young Men

    Angry Young Men
    Kingsley Amis and other young writers in Britain become known as Angry Young Men The Angry Young Men were a group of British writers of the mid-20th century. His works express the bitterness of the lower classes with respect to the prevailing socio-political system of his time and the mediocrity and hypocrisy of the middle and upper classes.
  • Graham Greene - The Quiet American

    Graham Greene - The Quiet American
    Graham Greene's novel The Quiet American is set in contemporary Vietnam and foresees troubles ahead The Quiet American is a novel published in 1955 by the British writer Graham Greene. The novel has been made into a movie twice: the first, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz in 1958, and the second, in 2002, directed by Phillip Noyce and starring Michael Caine and Brendan Fraser.
  • The Less Deceived

    The Less Deceived
    English poet Philip Larkin finds his distinctive voice in his collection The Less Deceived The Less Deceived, first published in 1955, was Philip Larkin's first collection of mature poetry, preceded by The Fortune Press derivative North Ship and a private collection, a small booklet entitled XX Poems, which Larkin mailed to literary critics and authors.
  • The Lord of the Rings

    The Lord of the Rings
    British philologist J.R.R. Tolkien publishes the third and final volume of his epic fantasy The Lord of the Rings
  • Look Back in Anger

    Look Back in Anger
    John Osborne's play Look Back in Anger features in the first season of London's new English Stage Company Look Back in Anger is a play by John Osborne released in 1956. Later a movie was made with it, in 1958, starring Richard Burton.
  • The Hawk in the Rain

    The Hawk in the Rain
    The Hawk in the Rain is English author Ted Hughes' first volume of poems The Hawk in the Rain is a collection of poems by the British poet Ted Hughes. Published in 1957, it was Hughes's first book of poetry. The book received immediate praise in both England and the United States, where it won the Galbraith Prize.
  • Justine launches - Lawrence Durrell

    Justine launches - Lawrence Durrell
    The publication of the novel Justine launches Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet Justine, is a genre novel written by Lawrence Durrell, published in 1957. This novel is the first volume of The Alexandria Quartet, and tells a complex story of passion and disappointment in Alexandria in the 30s and 40s.
  • Room at the Top; John Braine

    Room at the Top; John Braine
    English author John Braine publishes his first novel, Room at the Top. A Place at the Top is a 1957 novel by English writer John Braine. This novel tells the story of the unstoppable rise of Joe Lampton, a working-class climber, who makes his way as best he can in the strict England of the early post-war years.
  • Not saluting, but drowning Stevie Smith

    Not saluting, but drowning Stevie Smith
    English author Stevie Smith publishes her collection of poems Not Waving but Drowning "Not saluting, but drowning" is a poem by the British poet Stevie Smith. It was published in 1957 as part of a collection of the same title. The most famous of Smith's poems, it tells of a drowned man whose agitated shaking in the water had been mistaken for a greeting.
  • The Entertainer - John Osborne

    The Entertainer - John Osborne
    Laurence Olivier brings the music-hall artist Archie Rice vibrantly to life in John Osborne's The Entertainer The Entertainer is a three-act play by John Osborne, first produced in 1957. His first play, Look Back in Anger, had attracted mixed ads but a lot of publicity.
  • The Hostage - Brendan Behan

    The Hostage - Brendan Behan
    Irish dramatist Brendan Behan's play The Hostage is produced in Dublin The Hostage is a loose English version from 1958, with songs, adapted into a much longer text from an Irish one-act play An Giall, by its author, Brendan Behan.
  • Chicken Soup with Barley - Arnold Wesker

    Chicken Soup with Barley - Arnold Wesker
    Chicken Soup with Barley begins a trilogy by English playwright Arnold Wesker. Chicken Soup with Barley is a 1956 play by British playwright Arnold Wesker. It is the first of the 'Wesker trilogy – being followed by Roots and I'm Talking About Jerusalem – and was first performed on stage in 1958 at the Belgrade Theatre in Coventry, transferring later that year to the Royal Court Theatre in London.
  • Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

    Saturday Night and Sunday Morning
    English author Alan Sillitoe publishes his first novel, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning A true monument to English working-class literature and a touchstone of the British Angry Youngsters movement, "Saturday night and Sunday morning" was the novel that launched Alan Sillitoe to fame.
  • The Birthday Party - Harold Pinter

    The Birthday Party - Harold Pinter
    Harold Pinter's first play in London's West End, The Birthday Party, closes in less than a week The Birthday Party (1957) is the second full-length play by Harold Pinter, first published in London by Encore Publishing in 1959. It is one of his best-known and most frequently performed plays.
  • Billy Liar - Keith Waterhouse

    Billy Liar - Keith Waterhouse
    Keith Waterhouse has a wide success with his second novel, Billy Liar Billy Liar is a 1959 novel by Keith Waterhouse, which was later adapted into a play, film, musical, and television series. The work has inspired and featured in a number of popular songs.
  • The Caretaker - Harold Pinter

    The Caretaker - Harold Pinter
    Harold Pinter's second play in London's West End, The Caretaker, immediately brings him an international reputation. The Caretaker is a three-act play by British playwright Harold Pinter, released in 1960
  • Cider with Rosie - Laurie Lee

    Cider with Rosie - Laurie Lee
    British author Laurie Lee remembers a Cotswold boyhood in Cider with Rosie. Cider with Rosie is a 1959 book by Laurie Lee (published in the US as Edge of Day: Boyhood in the West of England, 1960). It is the first book of a trilogy that continues with As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning (1969) and A Moment of War (1991). It has sold over six million copies worldwide.
  • Summoned by Bells - John Betjeman

    Summoned by Bells - John Betjeman
    English poet John Betjeman publishes his long autobiographical poem Summoned by Bells. Summoned by Bells, John Betjeman's blank-verse autobiography describes his life from his earliest memories of a middle-class home in Edwardian Hampstead, London, to his premature departure from Magdalen College, Oxford.
  • Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons

    Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons
    Paul Scofield plays Thomas More in Robert Bolt's A Man for All Seasons King Henry VIII accuses Thomas More of having betrayed him when he opposes his designs, which intensifies the conflict with the monarchy. Dissatisfied, the king and the lawyers extend the accusation to other people.
  • D.H. Lawrence - Lady Chatterley's Lover

    D.H. Lawrence - Lady Chatterley's Lover
    Penguin Books are prosecuted for obscenity for publishing D.H. Lawrence's novel Lady Chatterley's Lover, and are acquitted. Lady Chatterley's Lover is a 1928 novel by British writer David Herbert Lawrence, also often quoted in abbreviated form, D. H. Lawrence. The play caused a scandal and was banned at the time, due to the scenes where sexual relations are explicitly described.
  • James and the Giant Peach - Roald Dahl

    James and the Giant Peach - Roald Dahl
    British author Roald Dahl publishes a novel for children, James and the Giant Peach James and the Giant Peach, known in Spanish under the titles James and the Giant Peach and James and the Giant Peach, is a novel for children by the British writer Roald Dahl, first published in 1961 by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. .
  • The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie - Muriel Spark

    The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie - Muriel Spark
    British novelist Muriel Spark publishes The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, set in an Edinburgh school in the 1930s. The Fullness of Miss Brodie is a short book by novelist Muriel Spark, the best known of her works.It first saw publication in The New Yorker magazine and was published as a book by Macmillan in 1961.
  • War Requiem - Wilfred Owen

    War Requiem - Wilfred Owen
    Benjamin Britten's War Requiem, setting poems by Wilfred Owen, is first performed in the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral The War Requiem, Op. 66 is a requiem composed by Benjamin Britten for the re-consecration of Coventry Cathedral on May 30, 1962 after it was destroyed during World War II. The requiem was composed for soprano, tenor and baritone soloists, choir, children's choir, and orchestra.
  • Doris Lessing - The Golden Notebook

    Doris Lessing - The Golden Notebook
    British author Doris Lessing publishes an influential feminist novel, The Golden Notebook. The Golden Notebook is a novel written by Doris Lessing and published in 1962. This book, as well as the couple that followed it, enters the realm of what Margaret Drabble in The Oxford Companion to English Literature has called "inner space fiction." Lessing's work that explores the mental and social breakdown.
  • Cover Her Face

    Cover Her Face
    British author P.D. James's first novel, Cover Her Face, introduces her poet detective Adam Dalgleish The huge and respectable Maxies' house in the English countryside seemed the ideal place for young Sally Jupp to work as a housekeeper and raise her son, but a horrible crime would soon end her illusions. Fortunately, Superintendent Adam Dalgliesh would handle the case.
  • A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess

    A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
    Anthony Burgess publishes A Clockwork Orange, a novel depicting a disturbing and violent near-future. A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian satirical black comedy novel by English writer Anthony Burgess, published in 1962. It is set in a near-future society that has a youth subculture of extreme violence. ... According to Burgess, it was a jeu d'esprit written in just three weeks.
  • Sylvia Plath (1932 - 1963)

    Sylvia Plath (1932 - 1963)
    US poet Sylvia Plath commits suicide in London. Sylvia Plath was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. She is credited with being one of the cultivators of the confessional poetry genre and is best known for two of her collections of poems: El coloso and Ariel.
  • The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

    The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
    English author John Le Carré publishes a Cold-War thriller The Spy Who Came in from the Cold The spy who arose from the cold is a novel written by the British John le Carré and published in 1963.
  • A Summer Birdcage - Margaret Drabble

    A Summer Birdcage - Margaret Drabble
    English author Margaret Drabble publishes her first novel, A Summer Birdcage. A Summer Bird-Cage is Margaret Drabble's 1963 debut novel published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. The title of the novel is taken from a quote from John Webster's The White Devil
  • Annus Mirabilis

    Annus Mirabilis
    Sexual intercourse begins in this year, according to Philip Larkin's 1974 poem Annus Mirabilis. Sexual intercourse began
    In nineteen sixty-three
    (which was rather late for me) -
    Between the end of the "Chatterley" ban
    And the Beatles' first LP. Up to then there'd only been
    A sort of bargaining,
    A wrangle for the ring,
    A shame that started at sixteen
    And spread to everything...
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    Roald Dahl publishes a fantasy treat for a starving child, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, written in 1964, is the third children's book based on true events by British author Roald Dahl.
  • Shadow of a Sun

    Shadow of a Sun
    English author A.S. Byatt publishes her first novel, Shadow of a Sun
    The Shadow of the Sun was A.S.Byatt's first novel, published in 1964
  • The Jewel in the Crown

    The Jewel in the Crown
    English novelist Paul Scott publishes The Jewel in the Crown, the first volume in his 'Raj Quartet'. The Jewel in the Crown is Paul Scott's 1966 novel that begins his Raj Quartet. The Quartet's novel four-volume sequence takes place during the last days of the British Raj in India during World War II.
  • Death of a Naturalist

    Death of a Naturalist
    Irish poet Seamus Heaney wins critical acclaim for Death of a Naturalist, his first volume containing more than a few poems. Death of a Naturalist is a collection of poems written by Seamus Heaney, who received the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature. The collection was Heaney's first major published volume and includes ideas that he had presented at meetings of The Belfast Group.
  • Wide Sargasso Sea

    Wide Sargasso Sea
    After a long period of obscurity, Wide Sargasso Sea brings novelist Jean Rhys back into the literary limelight. Wide Sargasso Sea is a postcolonial parallel novel written by Dominican-born writer Jean Rhys. Since her preceding work, Good Morning, Midnight, was published in 1939, Rhys had lived in darkness.
  • Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, by Tom Stoppard.

    Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, by Tom Stoppard.
    Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, by Tom Stoppard, is produced at the Edinburgh Festival. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, often referred to as just Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, is an absurd and existential tragicomedy by Tom Stoppard, first presented at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 1966.
  • The Magic Toyshop.

    The Magic Toyshop.
    English author Angela Carter wins recognition with her quirky second novel, The Magic Toyshop. Melanie goes down to the garden dressed in her mother's wedding dress; undresses and climbs the apple tree. The night is dark and fearful. Later, in the magic toy store, there are dolls that look like men and watch roses. Uncle Philip puts the toys together and has heavy hands and eyes the color of a wet newspaper.
  • Relatively Speaking

    Relatively Speaking
    English playwright Alan Ayckbourn has his first success with Relatively Speaking. Relatively Speaking is a play by British playwright Alan Ayckbourn released in 1965.
  • The Mersey Sound

    The Mersey Sound
    Three young Liverpool poets publish a shared anthology under the title The Mersey Sound. The Mersey Sound is an anthology of poems by Liverpool poets Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri first published in 1967, when it launched the poets to "considerable acclaim and critical fame".
  • A Day in the Death of Joe Egg

    A Day in the Death of Joe Egg
    A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, by English dramatist Peter Nichols, has its premiere in London.
    A Day in the Death of Joe Egg is a play by Peter Nichols, released in 1967.
  • Lytton Strachey

    Lytton Strachey
    English biographer Michael Holroyd completes his two-volume life of Lytton Strachey.
    Giles Lytton Strachey was an English writer and biographer, a member of the Bloomsbury Circle.
  • The French Lieutenant's Woman - John Fowles

    The French Lieutenant's Woman - John Fowles
    English novelist John Fowles publishes The French Lieutenant's Woman, set in Lyme Regis in the 1860s. The relationship between the actors in a movie is similar to that of its characters, who live an intense and forbidden love.
  • Terminal Moraine - James Fenton

    Terminal Moraine - James Fenton
    English poet James Fenton publishes his first collection, Terminal Moraine
  • Owners - Caryl Churchill

    Owners - Caryl Churchill
    English dramatist Caryl Churchill's first play, Owners, is produced in London Owners is a 1972 play by British playwright Caryl Churchill. It was first performed in the royal court theater of the theater above. The Royal Court production was directed by Nicholas Wright.
  • The Rachel Papers - Kingsley Amis

    The Rachel Papers - Kingsley Amis
    Martin Amis, son of Kingsley Amis, publishes his first novel, The Rachel Papers The Rachel Papers tells the story of Charles Highway, a bright, egotistical teenager and his relationship with his girlfriend in the year before going to university. Narrated by Charles on the eve of his twentieth birthday, the novel recounts Charles's last year of adolescence and his first love, Rachel Noyes, whom he meets in London while studying for his entrance exams into Oxford.
  • Small is Beautiful - Ernst Friedrich Schumacher

    Small is Beautiful - Ernst Friedrich Schumacher
    British economist Ernst Friedrich Schumacher publishes an influential economic tract, Small is Beautiful. Small is Beautiful: Economics as if People Matter is a collection of essays by the German economist E. F. Schumacher. The phrase "Small Is Beautiful" came from a phrase by his teacher Leopold Kohr.
  • Buildings of England - Nikolaus Pevsner

    Buildings of England - Nikolaus Pevsner
    German-born British art historian Nikolaus Pevsner completes his monumental 46-volume Buildings of England. The Pevsner Architectural Guides are a series of guides to the architecture of Great Britain and Ireland. Started in the 1940s by art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the 46 volumes of the original Buildings of England series were published between 1951 and 1974.
  • Heat and Dust - Ruth Prawer Jhabwala

    Heat and Dust - Ruth Prawer Jhabwala
    English author Ruth Prawer Jhabwala wins the Booker Prize with her novel Heat and Dust. Heat and Dust is a novel by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala that won the Booker Prize in 1975.
  • The Sea, the Sea - Iris Murdoch

    The Sea, the Sea - Iris Murdoch
    Iris Murdoch publishes The Sea, the Sea, and wins the 1978 Booker Prize. The sea, the sea is a philosophical novel by the Irish author Iris Murdoch, published in 1978. It is the nineteenth and most celebrated novel by the author, winner of the Booker Prize in 1978 and considered one of the masterpieces of English literature of the century XX.
  • The Pleasure Steamers - Andrew Motion

    The Pleasure Steamers - Andrew Motion
    English author Andrew Motion publishes his first collection of poems, The Pleasure Steamers. The Pleasure Steamers is Andrew Motion's first collection of poems. Formally adventurous, in the way his work has continued to be, the collection explores relationships, geographies and the legacy of the past to the present. Long sequences such as Inland and Anniversaries are interspersed with short, sharp lyrics which display the control, flare and delicacy which are the hallmarks of the Poet Laureate.
  • The Cement Garden - Ian McEwan

    The Cement Garden - Ian McEwan
    British author Ian McEwan publishes his first novel, The Cement Garden Cement Garden is a novel written by Ian McEwan in 1978. The original title is The Cement Garden. In 1993 it was adapted as a film of the same name, directed by Andrew Birkin, starring Charlotte Gainsbourg and Andrew Robertson.
  • Peter Shaffer - Amadeus

    Peter Shaffer -  Amadeus
    Peter Shaffer's play about Mozart, Amadeus, has its premiere in London Amadeus is a play written by the English playwright Peter Shaffer, loosely based on the lives of composers Antonio Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
  • War Music - Christopher Logue

    War Music - Christopher Logue
    War Music is the first instalment of 's version of the Iliad War Music is the working title of British poet Christopher Logue's long-term project to create a modernist poem based on Homer's Iliad, which began in 1959. It was originally the name of the first volume of that project, linking Patrocleia, GBH, and Pax, which was published in 1981.
  • Salman Rushdie - Midnight's Children

    Salman Rushdie - Midnight's Children
    Salman Rushdie's novel Midnight's Children uses the moment of India's independence to launch an adventure in magic realism Sons of Midnight is a 1980 book by Salman Rushdie that deals with the transition of India from British colonialism to independence and the partition of British India. It is considered an example of postcolonial literature and magical realism.
  • A Start in Life - Anita Brookner

    A Start in Life - Anita Brookner
    English author Anita Brookner publishes her first novel, A Start in Life A Start in Life is Anita Brookner's first novel. It was first published by Cape in 1981. The book was reissued by Penguin Essentials in 2017.
  • Noises Off - Michael Frayn

    Noises Off - Michael Frayn
    Michael Frayn's farce Noises Off opens in London's West end Noises Off or What a disaster of function! This play is a disaster, Entretelones or What a ruin of function! is a three-act play by British playwright Michael Frayn released in 1982.
  • The Economic Consequences of Mrs Thatcher

    The Economic Consequences of Mrs Thatcher
    British economist Nicholas Kaldor attacks monetarism in The Economic Consequences of Mrs Thatcher
  • The Dresser

    The Dresser
    Ronald Harwood's play The Dresser is partly inspired by the British actor Donald Wolfit. Norman is a man who works behind the scenes, dedicated to pleasing the abusive boss of a theater company while on tour.
  • Flaubert's Parrot - Julian Barnes

    Flaubert's Parrot - Julian Barnes
    English author Julian Barnes publishes a multi-faceted literary novel, Flaubert's Parrot. Flaubert's Parrot is a novel by Julian Barnes that was shortlisted for the Brooker Prize in 1984
  • The Dread Affair - Benjamin Zephaniah

    The Dread Affair - Benjamin Zephaniah
    British Rasta poet Benjamin Zephaniah publishes his second collection as The Dread Affair
  • Partingtime Hall - John Fuller and James Fenton

    Partingtime Hall - John Fuller and James Fenton
    English poets John Fuller and James Fenton collaborate in a volume of satirical poems, Partingtime Hall
  • Talking Heads - Alan Bennett

    Talking Heads - Alan Bennett
    Talking Heads, a series of dramatic monologues by English author Alan Bennett, is broadcast on British TV. A series of dramatic monologues written by British playwright Alan Bennett.
  • Period: to
    1400

    Contribution

    Famous works from this period include the history of the kings of Great Britain and the Canterbury tales( English writer Geoffrey Chaucer between 1387 and 1400)
  • Satanic Verses - Ayatollah Khomeini

    Satanic Verses - Ayatollah Khomeini
    Ayatollah Khomeini declares a fatwa against Salman Rushdie for his Satanic Verses
  • A Brief History of Time: from the Big Bang to Black Holes - Stephen Hawking

    A Brief History of Time: from the Big Bang to Black Holes - Stephen Hawking
    British physicist Stephen Hawking explains the cosmos for the general reader in A Brief History of Time: from the Big Bang to Black Holes A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes is a popular science book published in 1988 and written by British theoretical physicist, astrophysicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking and prefaced by Carl Sagan.
  • Racing Demon, David Hare

    Racing Demon, David Hare
    Racing Demon launches a trilogy on the British establishment by English playwright David Hare. Racing Demon is a 1990 play by English playwright David Hare. Part of a trio of plays about British institutions, it focuses on the Church of England and addresses issues such as gay ordination and the role of evangelism in inner-city communities. The play debuted at the National Theater.
  • The Madness of George III - Alan Bennett

    The Madness of George III - Alan Bennett
    Alan Bennett's play is performed at the National Theatre in London. The Madness of George III is a 1991 work by Alan Bennett. It is a fictional biographical study of the second half of the reign of George III of the United Kingdom, his battle with mental illness and the inability of his court to handle his condition.
  • World War I - Pat Barker

    World War I - Pat Barker
    Regeneration is the first volume of English author Pat Barker's trilogy of novels set during World War I. The Regeneration Trilogy is a series of three novels by Pat Barker on the theme of World War I. In 2012, The Observer named it as one of "The 10 Best Historical Novels." Regeneration The eye in the door The ghost road
  • Thom Gunn - The Man with Night Sweats deals

    Thom Gunn - The Man with Night Sweats deals
    English poet Thom Gunn's The Man with Night Sweats deals openly with AIDS
  • birdsong sebastian faulks

    birdsong sebastian faulks
    English novelist Sebastian Faulks publishes Birdsong, set partly in the trenches of World War I. In 1910, when the young Englishman Stephen Wraysford traveled to France to study René Azaire's textile company. Meet Isabelle with whom he lives an unforgettable romance. But his happiness will be brief, since Isabelle leaves him and, devastated, he returns to his country.
  • A suitable boy vikram seth

    A suitable boy vikram seth
    Vikram Seth publishes his novel A Suitable Boy, a family saga in post-independence India. Seldom has a novelistic debut aroused such excitement or achieved such stunning success: a monumental novel that critics compared to War and Peace and the older works of Dickens. "You too will marry whoever I say," Mrs. Rupa Mehra says to her daughter Lata at the beginning of this story.
  • Trainspotting - Irvine Welsh

    Trainspotting - Irvine Welsh
    Scottish author Irvine Welsh publishes his first novel, Trainspotting. Trainspotting is Irvine Welsh's first novel, published in 1993. In a rather pathetic yet humorous tone, the novel takes place in the late 1980s and deals with the rough, colorful and vigorous life of a group of unemployed young heroin addicts , drunkards and addicted to soccer, sex and rock and roll who were born on the hard side of life.
  • Captain Corelli's - Louis de Bernières

    Captain Corelli's - Louis de Bernières
    Louis de Bernières publishes Captain Corelli's Mandolin, a love story set in Italian-occupied Cephalonia. Captain Corelli's Mandolin, released simultaneously in the United States as Corelli's Mandolin, is a 1994 novel by British writer Louis de Bernières, set on the Greek island of Cephalonia during the Italian and German occupation of World War II.
  • Birthday Letters Ted Hughes

    Birthday Letters Ted Hughes
    The poems forming Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters describe his relationship with Sylvia Plath Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters are addressed, except for two, to Sylvia Plath, the mythical American poet with whom he was married and with whom he had two children.
  • Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone J.K. Rowling's

    Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone J.K. Rowling's
    A schoolboy wizard performs his first tricks in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is the first book in the Harry Potter literary series, written by British author J. K. Rowling in 1997, which also marked Rowling's debut as a professional writer. The novel was rejected by several publishers until Bloomsbury publishers decided to publish it.
  • Michael Frayn - Copenhagen

    Michael Frayn - Copenhagen
    Michael Frayn's play Copenhagen dramatizes the visit of Werner Heisenberg to Niels Bohr in wartime Denmark
  • The Amber Spyglass - Philip Pullman

    The Amber Spyglass - Philip Pullman
    The Amber Spyglass completes Philip Pullman's trilogy, His Dark Materials. The Lacquered Spyglass is the last novel in Philip Pullman's trilogy called The Dark Matter, first published in 2000.