SPED Law Timeline

Timeline created by Aide Lucero
In History
  • Brown VS. Board of Education

    Brown VS. Board of Education
    This court case is famous for its role in ending racial segregation in schools. Most importantly, this ruling made it illegal to discriminate against any group of people for arbitrary reasons. This meant that education would be mandated to be supplied to all citizens equally. That decision would eventually come to include students with disabilities.
  • The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965

    The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965
    The act provides federal funding to primary and secondary education, with funds authorized for professional development, instructional materials, resources to support educational programs, and parental involvement promotion.
    The act emphasizes equal access to education, aiming to shorten the achievement gaps between students by providing federal funding to support schools with children from impoverished families.
  • Architectural Barriers Act of 1968

    Architectural Barriers Act of 1968
    The Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 is an Act of Congress, enacted by President Lyndon B. Johnson. The ABA requires that facilities designed, built, altered, or leased with funds supplied by the United States Federal Government be accessible to all public.
  • Diana VS. CA State Board of Education

    Diana VS. CA State Board of Education
    This l case was essential to protecting the linguistic and educational rights of students. Most importantly, the ruling on this case required that students whose first language is not English be tested in English and their native language. This was to prevent students who did poorly on culturally specific tests being misdiagnosed as students with disabilities.
  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973)

    Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973)
    This was the first civil rights law that expressly forbade discrimination against an individual or group based on their disability. Most importantly, it required that no child be excluded from educational programs receiving federal aid based on their disability.
  • Education for All Handicapped Children Act

    Education for All Handicapped Children Act
    This act required all public schools to accept federal funds to provide equal access to education and one free meal a day for children with physical and mental disabilities.
    Public schools were required to evaluate children with disabilities and create an educational plan with parent input that would emulate as closely as possible the educational experience of non-disabled students.
    The act was an amendment to Part B of the Education of the Handicapped Act enacted in 1966.
  • Education for All Handicapped Children Act

    Education for All Handicapped Children Act
    President Gerald Ford signed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, otherwise known as Public Law 94-142. This law required all states that accepted money from the federal government were required to provide equal access to education for children with disabilities, in addition to providing them with one free meal per day. States had the responsibility to ensure compliance under the law within all of their public school systems.
  • The Handicapped Children's Protection Act of 1986

    The Handicapped Children's Protection Act of 1986
    The Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (EAHCA), Public Law (P.L.) 94-142, and regulations implementing it provides for a free, appropriate public education for all handicapped children. The act also provides procedural safeguards for parents of handicapped children when special education decisions are made by the schools. These safeguards ensure that the rights of handicapped children are protected.
  • Americans with Disabilities Act

    Americans with Disabilities Act
    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 or ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability.equires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities and impose accessibility requirements on public accommodations.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a legislation that ensures students with a disability are provided with Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) that is tailored to their individual needs. IDEA was previously known as the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EHA) from 1975 to 1990. Overall, the goal of IDEA is to provide children with disabilities the same opportunity for education as those students who do not have a disability.
  • No Child Left Behind Act

    No Child Left Behind Act
    Act of Congress that reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; it included Title I provisions applying to disadvantaged students. It supported standards-based education reform based on the premise that setting high standards & establishing measurable goals could improve individual outcomes in education.
    The Act required states to develop assessments in basic skills. To receive federal school funding states had to give these assessments to all students at select grade levels.