The Evolution of Medicene-samar

Timeline created by mrsimpson
  • Apr 13, 850

    Hospitals

    Hospitals
    The Islamic Authorities placed a lot of value in medicine. Baghdad had a hospital by AD 850 and doctors had to pass medical examinations by AD 931 in order to practice. Hospitals were later developed throughout the Islamic world, with the most famous being those in Damascus and Cairo.
  • Apr 12, 900

    arab medicine

    arab medicine
    Medical schools and hospitals were built to support the work of Arabic doctors like Rhazes (900 A.D.) who further explored medicine as a science.
  • Apr 14, 1112

    Ibn Sina

    Ibn Sina
    Because Arab pharmacopoeia came from so many sources—as far afield as China, Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, southern India and West Africa—it was enormous. In his second volume of the Canon of Medicine, Ibn Sina (a.d. 980–1037, also known as Avicenna) describes 235 remedies, of which 97 still appear in the official British Pharmacopoeia, as well as 760 medicinal plants and their uses. Ibn Sina also laid out the rules that are the basis of clinical trials today.
  • Apr 14, 1200

    Ibn Nafis

    Ibn Nafis
    Another famous doctor from the Islamic Empire was called Ibn Nafis. He lived in Damascus, Syria, in the 1200's AD. Among other things, Ibn Nafis was the first scientist to describe how blood goes from your heart to your lungs to get air and then distributes the air all over your body. (The Roman doctor Galen had suggested some ideas, but Ibn Nafis showed that Galen's ideas were wrong).
  • Aug 19, 1464

    prophetic medicine.

    prophetic medicine.
    A treatise on Prophetic Medicine by al-Dhahabi, who died in 1348 (748 H). A Syro-Egyptian copy completed on 19 August 1464 (14 Dhu al-Hijjah 868 H).
  • medical writing

    medical writing
    A genre of medical writing intended as an alternative to the exclusively Greek-based medical systems derivative from Galen was that called al-tibb al-nabawi, Prophetic Medicine. The authors were clerics, rather than physicians, advocating the traditional medical practices of the Prophet Muhammad's day and those mentioned in the Qur'an over the medical ideas assimilated from Hellenistic society, thereby producing a guide to medical therapy acceptable to the religiously orthodox. Therapy consisted