Timeline of SPED

Timeline created by iandemment
In History
  • Brown vs. Board of Education

    Brown vs. Board of Education
    First time that law said segregation was illegal.
  • Elementary and Secondary Education Act

    Elementary and Secondary Education Act
    The 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act "became the statutory basis upon which early special education legislation was drafted
  • Congress amended the ESEA

    Congress amended the ESEA
    In 1966, Congress had amended the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to establish grant program that would help expand, and improve the new law and other programs and projects related to the ESEA. Such as the education of handicapped children.
  • Changes to the ESEA

    Changes to the ESEA
    President Richard Nixon signed the 1969 ESEA amendments, which included Title II funding for programs for refugee children and children residing in low–rent public housing. Title VI was dedicated to the education of individuals with disabilities.
  • The Education of the Handicapped Act

    The Education of the Handicapped Act
    In 1970, the program was replaced by the Education of the Handicapped Act and established grant program that aimed at stimulating each States to develop educational programs and resources for individuals with disabilities.
  • Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (PARC)

    Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (PARC)
    This case involved students with mental retardation being denied their constitutional right to equal protection under the law.This was important to special education students because the court ruled that students with mental retardation had to be granted an education similar or equal to their non-disabled peers.
  • Mills v. Board of Education of District of Columbia

    Mills v. Board of Education of District of Columbia
    This case claimed that students with disabilities were being excluded from school. This case made the needs of the child come before fiscal restraints from the school.This case was important to special education students because it established due process procedures to ensure all students disabled or non-disabled equal protection under the law.
  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act 1973

    Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act 1973
    This law is important because it was the first civil rights statute for people with disabilities. This law also helped in the formation of the American Disability Act. It was important to special education students because it was the first nationwide law that stated that students with disabilities should be provided with a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. Today's IEP's reflect this ruling.
  • Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA)

    Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA)
    Law was passed that recognized the need for special education services for those who were diagnosed with learning disabilities.
  • Board of Education of Hendrick Hudson Central School District v. Rowley

    Board of Education of Hendrick Hudson Central School District v. Rowley
    The Supreme Court established a "basic floor of responsibility." This states that a school is not required to provide the maximum amount of services to meet the goals of children's IEP's. It ruled schools were only responsible for meeting the basic needs of a child.This was important to special education students in that schools weren't required to provide services above and beyond only the basic necessities. This would later be challenged.
  • Honig vs Doe

    Honig vs Doe
    The case of Honig vs Doe has a big effect on the lives of special education students. This case decided that students who have exceptionalities cannot be denied education even if they are misbehaving. This ensures that all students have an education, which is what we are striving for.
  • IDEA

    IDEA
    The EAHCA changed it's name to Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1990 under PL 101-476. This was a major change, because Autism and traumatic brain injury were added under the categories of special education. This act started transition plans (ITPs) for students with disabilities. Info from sheet used as well.
  • Doe vs Withers

    Doe vs Withers
    In the case of Doe vs Withers, the Doe familiy argued that once their son entered high school, the school was not complying the FAPE. The student was on an IEP and had accommodations throughout elementary and middle school. But, in high school, some teachers wouldn't comply. This case ruled that teachers are responsible for implementing accommodations listed in the student's IEP.
  • IDEA (reauthorized)

    IDEA (reauthorized)
    In 1997, IDEA was reauthorized to include ADHD. Behavior assessments and intervention plans were now put into place, as they hadn't been before. This reauthorization also changed ITPs to IEP (Individualized Education Plan).
  • No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act

    No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act
    The ESEA was later changed to the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, and was enacted in 2002. NCLB represented a significant step forward for children in many respects, particularly it shined a light on where students were making progress and where they needed additional support, regardless of race, income, zip code, disability, home language, or background.
  • IDEA (reauthorized)

    IDEA (reauthorized)
    This is the most recent reauthorization of IDEA. This act required that special education teachers need to be highly qualified. It also changed the identification process for learning disabilities. This act was reauthorized to accommodate students that were having problems with weapons, drugs, or violence by placing them in an interim alternative educational setting.
  • President Obama allows waivers for NCLB

    President Obama allows waivers for NCLB
    President Obama allows states to request waivers for flexibility in meeting some of the requirements in the NCLB act. This is due to the fact that the NCLB act has yet to be reauthorized. Through the waiver schools can show student improvement (AYP) through multiple means a benefit for students with disabilities.
  • Jaffrey-Rindge School District Makes Wise Changes

    Jaffrey-Rindge School District Makes Wise Changes
    The Jaffrey-Rindge School District working with an advocate group from Jaffrey-Rindge called ABLE NH, changed the restraint and seclusion policy in the district. The state of New Hampshire does not regulate the use of seclusion. However, the Jaffrey-Rindge School District has adopted a policy that reflects the 15 principles recommended by the Department of Education in May 2012.The change provided training to teachers to have the right tools to use when dealing with this student population.
  • The new Education law

    The new Education law
    The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was signed by President Obama on December 10, 2015, this law reauthorizes the 50-year-old Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), which is the nation’s national education law and longstanding commitment to equal opportunity for all students.
    The new law builds on key areas of progress in students regardless of background, which made possible by the efforts of educators, communities, parents, and students across the country.