U.S. History

Timeline created by lsalova
In History
  • Great awakeneing

    -It was important because it brought people to come together and listen to sermons, but at the same time people started gathering and talking about politics,economics, and questioning the British authority.
    -The event was caused because church leaders felt as though people weren't as religous as they used to be.
    -During the event preachers came preaching sermons . Mostly took place from Georgia to New England.
  • Great Awakeneing

    -Most colonists accepted this. While others, often called the "Old Lights", were against this. Still, when colonists later on gathered together, they would discuss or question the British authority.
  • French and Indian War

    As more settlers started moving into the colonies,more space was needed. Eventaully, the Brirtish colonies settled west of the Appalachians mountains. The Indians ,however, didn't like the idea of the Brirtish settling on their lands. This caused conflict and the two sides started war.
  • Proclamation of 1763

    To prevent more life loss caused by the French and Indian Wars, King George the third passed the Proclamation of 1763. This law banned British settlement west of the Appalachian Mountains. The law also ordered settlers to leave the upper Ohio River valley.
  • Sugar Act

    The British needed to pay off the dept for the French and Indian War, so the Parliament passed the sugar act. This law put a tax coffee, indigo, wine,molasses and sugar. The law was passed without the colonists agreement. Many colonists' didn't like this and some started boycotting.
  • Stamp Act

    The British were still trying to find ways to raise money for the War. Again, the Parliament taxed the colonists' without their consent.This time they passed the stamp act, forcing colonists' to pay for a stamp on al of their paper products.The Stamp Act was Parliament’s first attempt to raise money by taxing the colonists directly, rather than by taxing imported goods. This angered the colonists' even more, causing protests and forming a secret society called the Sons of Liberty.
  • Stamp Act

    After a while the merchants started complaining about the boycotting, forcing the Parliament to repeal the stamp act in 1766.
  • Townsheds Acts

    The Townsheds Acts placed taxes on glass, lead, paints, paper, and tea. To enforce the Townshend Acts, British officials used writs of assistance. These allowed tax collectors to search for smuggled goods. The colonists' boycotted, but this time women calling themselves Daughters of Liberty replaced the goods by making their own. Samuel Adams wrote a letter with protests against the taxation and sent it out to other colonies’ legislatures, who voted to join the protest.
  • Townsheds Acts

    Meanwhile, a ship named Liberty was being searched in suspicion of smuggling. The owner and Sons of liberty didn't like this. They attacked the houses of customs officials in protest.In response, the governor broke up the Massachusetts legislature. He also asked troops to restore order.
  • Boston Massacre

    Many colonists weren't hapy with the presence of the British troops. As a result, there were tensions between the troops and the colonists'. One day a soldier and colonists got into an arguemeent and the troop struck the colonist. A crowd gathered and started throwing snowballs and shouting insults at the soldier. Soon the crowd got bigger and angrier. A few more soldiers came out and shoot into the crowd. Word spread of this and the protestors used this as a propaganda.
  • Boston Massacre

    The soldiers were put on trail and released when John Adams defended the troops saying they were acting in self-defense.
  • Tea Act

    Despite the colonial boycotting against the Townsheds Acts, colonial demands for tea were high. When the Townsheds acts was repealed they kept the tax on tea. Most of the tea was smuggled by the colonists and so the tax was not paid. The British East Indian Company had lots of tea, but it couldn't sell the tea directly to colonists. As a result, the Tea Act was passed in which the British East Indian Company could sell
    tea to colonists for a cheap price to stop the smuggling and pay the tea tax.
  • Boston Tea Party

    Many colonial merchants and smugglers feared that the British East India Company’s cheap tea would put them out of business. As a result, colonists united against the Tea Act. Three ships filled with the British East Indian Company came into harbor and were told to leave by the Sons of Liberty. But the governor of Massachusetts would not let the ships leave without paying the duty. Unsure of what to do, the captains waited in the harbor.
  • Boston Tea Party

    One night, the Sons of Librty disguised as Indians crept onto the three ships filled with tea and dumped 90,000 pounds or 45 tons of tea into the Boston Harbor.
  • Intolerable Acts

    When the British heard about the Boston Tea Party they were furious and passed out the Intolerable Acts. These acts were -the Boston harbor was closed until they have paid out the cost of the ruined tea 2.Massachusetts’s charter was canceled. The governor decided if and when the legislature could meet. 3.Royal officials accused of crimes were sent to Britain for trial.This let them face a more freindly judge and jury. 4.A new Quartering Act required colonists to house British soldiers.
  • Intolerable Acts

    5.The Quebec Act gave a large amount of land to the colony of Quebec. 6. General Thomas Gage became the new governor of Massachusetts.
  • Battle of Lexington/Concord

    The captain of the colonists' told his troops not to fire until fired upon. Someone made the first shot and the war began. No one to this day who fired, but it is said that it was a shot heard around the world. The colonists' were badly outnumbered with 8 minutemen dead and 10 wounded. Then the British troops marched to Concord where they destroyed the weapons they found. Suddenly, minutemen from behind every tree, fence, and building started firing at the British, their uniforms making target.
  • Battle of Lexington/Concord

    The British were told that there are colonial weapons in Concord. In response, the British General sent out 700 of his men to destroy the warehouse. Word spread that the British were heading for Concord. On a signal, Paul Revere, William Dawes, and Samuel Prescott set off on horseback to warn the minutemen of British. At dawn the British troops arrived at the town of Lexington, where 70 armed minutemen awaited the British advance.
  • Battle of Bunker Hill

    Desperate for supplies, leaders in Boston authorized Benedict Arnold to raise a force of 400 men to attack the British at Fort Ticonderoga. On May 10, 1775, during an early morning storm, the Patriots quickly took the fort and its large supply of weapons. While the British were pinned down by the poorly supplied minutemen and planning on breaking the colonial siege south of Boston, the Americans took on the hill overlooking northern Boston. They were taken by surprise in the morning.
  • Battle of Bunker Hill

    Climbing the exposed hillside with their heavy packs, the Redcoats were cut down. Twice, they had to retreat. On the third try, the Americans were running out of gunpowder. When they ran out, they threw rocks, used their empty guns as clubs, and went to fight in hand. The British suffered more than 1,000 casualties, about double the American losses.
  • Common Sense

    Common sense was a 47-page pamphlet published in January 1776 that urged separation from Great Britain. Common Sense was published anonymously—that is, without the author’s name. The author, Thomas Paine, argued that citizens, not kings and queens, should make laws.
  • Decleration of Independence

    The committee members were John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Robert R. Livingston, and Roger Sherman. Jefferson was the document’s main author.
    The Declaration of Independence formally announced the colonies’ break from Great Britain. In doing so, it expressed three main ideas. The first idea Jefferson argued was that all men possess unalienable rights. He stated that these basic rights include “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”
  • Decleration of Independence

    Second, Thomas Jefferson argued that the king violated all of the colonies rights, passed unfair laws without their consent and interfered with the colonial governments. Third, he argued that colonies had the right to break away from Britain.
  • Battle of Saratoga

    The British General John Burgoyne had plans to push through New York, capture the Hudson River valley, and cut off New England from the other colonies. General Howe, in New York City, would sail up the Hudson River to meet him, strangling New England. Unknown to Burgoyne, Howe had his own plans. He left New York, sailed up the Chesapeake Bay, and captured the colonial capital of Philadelphia. Delegates to the Continental Congress were forced to flee.
  • Battle of Saratoga

    While the British were trying to push their way through the forest, all along the route, militiamen swarmed out of nowhere to attack the Redcoats.As Burgoyne neared Saratoga, New York, he found himself alone and outnumbered. The Americans won a major victory.
  • Battle of Yorktown

    The patriots are very low on supplies and the British have most of the colonies. American morale took another blow when Benedict Arnold, one of America’s most gifted officers, turned traitor. Hoping to stay in communication with the British naval fleet, Cornwallis moved his force of 7,200 men to Yorktown, Virginia. It was a fatal mistake. He ordered Lafayette to block Cornwallis’s escape by land. Then he combined his 2,500 troops with 4,000 French troops.
  • Battle of Yorktown

    Washington led the French-American force on a swift march to Virginia to cut off the other escape routes. The Patriots surrounded Cornwallis with some 16,000 soldiers. Meanwhile, a French naval fleet seized control of the Chesapeake Bay, preventing British ships from rescuing Cornwallis’s stranded army.The siege began. For weeks, the fighting steadily wore down the British defenses. In early October, Washington prepared for a major attack on the weakened British troops.
  • Treaty of Paris

    After Yorktown, only a few small battles took place. Lacking the money to pay for a new army, Great Britain entered into peace talks with America. Benjamin Franklin had an influential role in the negotiations. Delegates took more than two years to come to a peace agreement. In the Treaty of Paris of 1783, Great Britain recognized the independence of the United States.