Western Civilization - Topics 1&2

Timeline created by twarnke
In History
  • 3,000 BCE

    Kings Supersede Priests

    Kings Supersede Priests
    Before this point, especially in Mesopotamia, priests were given the highest authority as they were believed to have power to soothe the gods. However, priests started to proclaim that the kings were descended from gods and the main authority was shifted to the kings. This belief continued for millennia in several of the earliest civilizations.
  • 3,000 BCE

    Mesopotamians Develop Cuneiform

    In the time preceding 3000 BCE, written languages were not developed. Mesopotamians created a pictographic script for the scribes to record with. Eventually, Egyptians created their own pictographic script known as hieroglyphics that look similar in many ways to cuneiform. Written language is a trait used to communicate and record that many early civilizations formed as they developed.
  • Period:
    3,000 BCE
    to
    -200 BCE

    Summary: Most Important Events

    All of the events or people listed on this timeline were very significant in furthering Western Civilization. As shown on this timeline, successful civilizations included a strong government structure, organized culture, and established writing forms for education and communication. Without bureaucratic leaders of some sort, militaries would not have direction and maintaining diplomacy would be unfeasible. Forms of currency and language made trading more efficient and strengthened civilizations.
  • 2,340 BCE

    First True Empire Formed

    First True Empire Formed
    King Sargon the Great, managed to gain control of nearly all Mesopotamian cities and formed the first true empire. Lasting nearly a century before collapsing, Sargon's empire fueled other leaders and civilizations to conquer neighboring territories to gain power. Sargon also created the first standing army; soldiers were employed by the state to fight and defend as their only job. This was the beginning of the race for domination.
  • 1,754 BCE

    The Code of Hammurabi

    The Code of Hammurabi
    The sixth Babylonian king, Hammurabi, created a code of 282 laws for his people to follow, but the Code spread to influence many other nations.
  • 1,300 BCE

    Phoenicians Form Alphabet

    Phoenicians Form Alphabet
    Taking after the Canaanites, the Phoenicians furthered their worth to form a syllabic alphabet with simpler symbols to represent sounds. Just as the Mesopotamians influenced other civilizations with their script, Phoenicians used Greek and Roman roots to develop their own form of writing that could be taught to sailors or merchants to communicate.
  • 1,200 BCE

    Empires Collapse

    For many reasons unknown, many of the world's most powerful empires collapsed and the trading routes were mostly depleted as the Bronze Age concluded. During this time, Greece entered a dark age until rebuilding - along with most other nations, many recovering for about a century. As devastating as these events were at the time, it forced the civilizations to enter into the Iron Age and eventually created new trade routes, empires, and dynasties.
  • 1,100 BCE

    Iron Age Begins

    Iron Age Begins
    Many societies submerged from the collapse of empires and prospered due to the start of the Iron Age. Trade routes were established and civilizations developed new technology and weaponry to strengthen their empires.
  • -722 BCE

    Assyrians Attack Israel

    Assyrians Attack Israel
    Prior to the destruction of northern Israel, the Yahweh faith professed there was only one god, but it never specified that their god ruled over every nation - only the Hebrew kingdom. After Assyrians attacked Israel, it was then believed that Yahweh was both omniscient and omnipresent, all powerful and always present. This belief spread and sacred texts were recorded that live on today to show the significance of the religion.
  • -650 BCE

    Silver and Gold Currency

    Silver and Gold Currency
    Lydians created lumps of silver and gold called "staters" that were used as currency and increased the efficiency of trading tremendously.
  • -538 BCE

    Cyrus Frees the Babylonians

    When Persia gained control over Neo-Babylonian empire, Cyrus the Great was the reigning Persian emperor who freed the enslaved Babylonians. Many Jews then returned to their homeland and rebuilt Solomon's Temple, but many Jews remained in the Persian empire and spread their beliefs. Even though the Jews were dispersed, they were still connected through their religion and culture.